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Arabic / Year 3 and 4 / Understanding / Systems of language

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Recognise and reproduce Arabic pronunciation and intonation patterns using vocalisation and features of individual syllable blocks, and understand that in Arabic script, most letters change appearance depending on their position

[Key concepts: sound and writing systems, syllables; Key processes: noticing, describing, comparing]

 (ACLARU131)

Elaborations
  • discriminating between simple vowels, for example, تَ؛ تِ؛ تُ , long vowels or the three vowel letters ا؛و؛ي , such as تا؛ تي؛ تو and consonant letters in a syllable block
  • using basic punctuation in writing, including question marks (?), commas (,) and full stops (.) and semi-colons (؛)
  • recognising that letters change form depending on their place in the word, for example,

    ك: كتب؛ يكتب؛ كتابك؛ ع: عين؛ معلم؛ م

  • noticing that vocalisation such asَ؛ ِ؛ ُ may change the function of the word depending on where it is placed, for example, كَتَبَ؛ كُتُب؛ لَعِبَ؛ لُعَب
  • experimenting with Arabic words and vowels to construct and deconstruct syllable blocks, for example, …كا/تب؛ سا/لم؛ فا/دي؛ كر/سي؛ غر/فة؛
  • using basic pronunciation and intonation rules when speaking and reading aloud
  • deducing from familiar sounds and contexts how to spell new words, for example, predicting how to spell هادي؛ وادي؛ شادي having learnt how to spell فادي
  • comparing different forms of writing for the letter أ, for example, أ؛إ؛آ
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Pronunciation,  Arabic language,  Syllable blocks,  Characters (Writing systems),  Intonation

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