Close message Scootle has stopped supporting resources that use the Adobe Flash plug-in from 18 Dec 2020. Learning paths that include these resources will have alerts to notify teachers and students that one or more of the resources will be unavailable. Click here for more info.

Framework for Aboriginal Languages and Torres Strait Islander Languages / Year 3 to 6 / Understanding / Systems of language

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Expand vocabulary in the target language through word-formation and building processes, and recognise and use simple structures

[Key concepts; word formation, word class, grammatical person and number, negation; Key processes: noticing, comparing, applying, understanding, modifying meaning]

 (ACLFWU100)

Elaborations
  • understanding the concept of word formation, for example, how a word changes meaning and form with the addition/change of a suffix or prefix to convey different meanings
  • constructing expressions referring to people, places, things and events in building and varying messages, using:
    • nouns and adjectives in phrases for people, characters, places and objects, for example, compound nouns, reduplications and nominalisations, adjectives used without an associated noun
    • sentences without verbs, for example, ‘this (is) my bag’
    • different types of pronouns, for example, personal, kinship, demonstrative and interrogative in all persons and numbers
    • determiners and quantifiers, for example, ‘some’, ‘every’, ‘other’, ‘few’, ‘much’, ‘all’, and words for groups
    • marking to indicate possession and other types of association, for example, ‘let’s go for water’
    • appropriate use of transitive and intransitive verbs
    • verbs of stance used in existential expressions, for example, ‘there is a creek lying near the road’
    • verbs to talk about actions, processes, thoughts and feelings
    • moods of verbs including statements, questions, imperatives, commands, intention, purpose, likelihood, reported speech
    • negation
  • expressing time, manner, attitude and place, using:
    • tenses, including past, present and future/non-past
    • temporal expressions, for example, relating to day–night cycle, lunar and seasonal cycles, ‘before’ and ‘after’, ‘soon’, ‘recent’, ‘long ago’
    • expressions of frequency, for example, ‘often’, ‘always’, ‘once’, ‘briefly’
    • sentence-level attitudinal particles, for example, ‘maybe’, ‘it is said’, ‘what do you say?’, ‘would you mind?’, ‘you see’
    • locational cases, for example, ‘in’, ‘an’, ‘at’, ‘near’, ‘besides’, ‘to’, ‘towards’, ‘from’
    • adverbs of manner, location and time, for example, ‘again’, ‘more’, ‘in turn’, ‘too late’, ‘as well’
    • structuring and linking clauses, for example, relating to coordination, subordination, embedding
  • understanding that languages are rule-bound and systematic
  • understanding that rules vary between languages, for example, in relation to word-building and word order at phrase and sentence level
  • making comparisons and identifying patterns in and between languages, for example, in relation to free and fixed word order, tenses in verbs, the use of affixes versus prepositions
  • noticing similarities between particular vocabulary sets in languages from the same region, such as words for body parts
  • developing metalanguage for talking about elements of language, for example, noun phrases, suffixes, prefixes, tense, transitivity
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
Cross-curriculum priorities
ScOT terms

Australian languages

Refine by resource type

Refine by year level


Refine by learning area


Refine by topic

Related topic * No suggestions
Video

Learn to count in Kaurna!

Presenter Taylor Power-Smith helps us learn to count to ten in Kaurna, the Indigenous language of the Kaurna people of Adelaide and the Adelaide Plains. 

Video

Preserving Aboriginal languages

Explore some of the challenges facing many Aboriginal languages and how one man is trying to preserve these 'ancient words'. Consider, too, why languages are important.

Image

1860s Colonial life

No TV. No electricity. No running water. No car. Imagine living on sheep stations in New South Wales in the 1860s.

Audio

Re-awakening Australian Aboriginal languages

Did you know that before colonisation there were about 250 distinct Aboriginal and Torres Strait lslander languages being spoken across Australia? Today, however, the majority of these languages are endangered. Listen to a number of significant Australians discussing the Aboriginal language situation in Australia today. ...

Video

One English language or many?

Do people around Australia all speak the same English? In this clip, explore the ways that language evolves and consider the impacts that other 'Englishes', such as British English and American English, can have on the way we speak.

Video

Yaama Ghubhii: Indigenous Connect Song

Watch the students of Moree East Public School as they perform a song that welcomes people to Gamilaroi land in traditional languague. Listen to the words of the song. What are some of the things the students talk about in their song? What sort of instruments can you hear? How would you describe this style of music? Do ...

Video

Count to 10 in Gomeroi

Learn how to count to 10 in Gomeroi! Community cultural leader Matthew Priestley has been teaching students at Moree East Public School how to speak the traditional Gomeroi language. Listen as the students teach you.

Video

Gubuluk

Listen as Anne Gela tells the story of "Gubuluk". Anne is a Mualgal woman from the St Paul community of Moa Island, which is in the inner-west Torres Strait group of islands. Can you find Moa Island on a map? Anne speaks Big Thap Creole/Yumplatok.

Video

The Buyungurra who didn't listen

Listen as Bianca McNeair shares the story of "The Buyungurra who didn't listen". This is a traditional story that Bianca's mother told her when she was growing up. Bianca uses words from the Malgana language, which is spoken in the area around Shark Bay in Western Australia.

Video

Preserving the Badimaya language

The Badimaya language covers areas ranging from Paynes Find, Ninghan Station and Mount Magnet in Western Australia, but the language is in danger of becoming extinct. How important is it to preserve a language? Watch this video to find out the importance of language to identity and culture.

Video

Name parts of the body in Dhurga

Watch and listen as students of St Mary's Primary School in Moruya teach you how to name eight body parts in Dhurga. Dhurga is the first language of the NSW far south coast between Wandandean, Braidwood and Wallaga Lake.

Audio

Learning Dharug, Aboriginal language of Sydney

Imagine a time when the Aboriginal language Dharug was the official language spoken in the Sydney area. During this audio clip, reflect on how the language was considered almost 'lost', but (and) discover how Richard Green and others are piecing the Dharug language back together. Find out about how it is being taught at ...

Video

Learning some Warrgamay words

Uncle Bill welcomes us to Warrgamay Country. He shows us the animals that live in and around a natural waterhole he calls the 'swimming hole', and tells us the animal's Warrgamay names. Let's find out why Uncle Bill and his family feel happy in this place.

Video

Learn a Dhurga greeting

Walawaani! Learn this Dhurga greeting by listening to teacher Kerry Boyenga and the students of St Mary's Primary School in Moruya. Walawaani means "We hope you've had a safe journey here", or "We hope you have a safe journey home". Dhurga is the first language of the NSW far south coast between Wandandean, Braidwood and ...

Video

Welcome to Shelly Beach, Port Lincoln

Watch and listen as local Parnkalla (Barngarla) boys Darnell and Kaiden Richards take you to their special place: Shelly Beach in Port Lincoln, South Australia. Learn some local Parnkalla words as the boys share a story about what connects their family and community to this beach.

Audio

May O'Brien talks about Aboriginal storytelling, 2008

This is an edited sound recording of an interview with Western Australian Aboriginal educator and author May O'Brien. O'Brien says that in her early life she was told Aboriginal stories orally and in drawings in the sand. She says that when she puts Aboriginal stories in writing, she thinks carefully about the words she ...

Audio

May O'Brien recalls the traditional bush lifestyle of her childhood, 2008

This is an edited sound recording of an interview with Western Australian Aboriginal educator and author May O'Brien. She recalls the traditional bush lifestyle of her childhood in the eastern goldfields region of WA. She describes living in comfortable humpies made from bush materials and how she was taught traditional ...