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Teacher resource

Researching produce in your local region

This is a teacher resource containing a series of inquiry teaching sequences relating to local food and fibre production. It contains material to assist planning, implementing and assessing a research task about the places in the local region that grow and manufacture produce. This resource includes links to online videos, ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: jillora

Spinning balls or tops of various kinds were used as an amusement by Aboriginal people in most parts of Australia and by Torres Strait Islanders. The spin-ball used in the northwest central districts of Queensland was a round ball of about 2 to 3 centimetres in diameter. It was made of lime, ashes, sand, clay and sometimes ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: chuboochuboo

A chuboochuboo is a wallaby skin stuffed with grass and about the size of a football. Men, women and children played the game. The game generated a great deal of fun and enjoyment and never any arguments. It was observed being played in parts of South Australia. The Aboriginal people of the Lower Murray and surrounding ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: kai wed

In this game from the Torres Strait Islands, a number of players stood in a circle and sang the kai wed (ball song) as they hit a ball up in the air with the palm of their hands. The game was often played using the thick, oval, deep-red fruit of the kai tree, which is quite light when dry. This game was apparently introduced ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: juluhya

A favourite pastime of the Aboriginal children in the Numinbah Valley area of south Queensland was rolling small round pebbles down long sheets of bark. These were folded in a tubular fashion. Competitions were held to see whose pebble appeared first. This activity involves a group of players working together to roll a ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: diyari koolchee

This ball-throwing and hitting game was played by the Diyari people from near Lake Eyre in South Australia. The balls were called koolchee. The aim of the activity is to roll a ball to rebound off a wall in order to hit a skittle. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: kandomarngutta

In some parts of Australia children were allowed to use the bullroarer (whirlers), or small versions of it, as a source of amusement. In other areas the bullroarer had a special significance and was not used as a ‘toy’. In parts of Victoria a bullroarer called the kandomarngutta was used. This was a thin piece of wood, ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: brajerack

Many different types of hide-and-seek games were played in Australia and the Torres Strait Islands. A game played in one part of Victoria in the latter part of the 1800s was called brajerack (the wild man). It was essentially a game of hide and seek whereby a player would hide in a wombat hole and would need to be dug out ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: kangaroo

Imitation activities were a favourite and popular activity for children everywhere. In one activity children would copy the actions of the kangaroo. This is a jumping relay race based on the actions of a kangaroo jumping. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: inkanyi

Although not a universal activity, athletic events were common. In a part of central Australia the children would have running races together. The race was a cooperative effort. According to age, running speed and fitness levels, runners started at different distances and all players attempted to finish together. This activity ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: kamai

Using a length of twine, adult women and young children of both genders often amused themselves for hours at a time with cat’s cradle (string-figure games). These were played almost everywhere throughout Australia and also in the Torres Strait. In some areas older boys and adult men also played these games. Elaborate figures ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: birray

Young children in the Bloomfield area of north Queensland played the game of birray (march-fly). It was observed by Walter Roth in the early 1900s. This is a game where a chaser (birray) attempts to tag (touch) other players. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: giriga

A duck ‘catching’ game was played by little boys and girls at Cape Bedford, Cooktown and the McIvor regions in north Queensland. This game was recorded by Walter Roth in the early 1900s. This is a role-play, running-and-chasing tag game suitable for younger children. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: Gitja

The Gitga (moon) play game from the north Queensland area was usually played when a number of children gathered together. The full version of the game observed involved imitation and acting aspects along with a running-and-chasing activity. This is a chasing-and-catching (tag) game. It is a simplified version of a more ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: borna jokee

In parts of Western Australia mimic battles with toy spears frequently took place among the younger male members of the camp. Mock fights and duels were fought. There were also trials of skill with kyley and spear and kangaroo and emu hunts, the children taking turns at being hunter and hunted. In these activities the boys ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: gorri

Bowling-ball or disc games were played by Aboriginal boys and men in all parts of Australia. A piece of rounded bark (disc) was rolled by one of the players for the other boys to use as a target for their short spears. A version of this activity is still played in the Kimberley area and Northern Territory (and perhaps elsewhere) ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: kalkadoon kee'an

In areas of north Queensland, a game of throwing skill was played. A large bone, such as an emu shinbone (with twine attached to it) was thrown over a net (used to catch emus) into a pit or hole. Considering the distance to the hole, great skill was required to correctly aim the bone and ensure that it did not touch the ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: mer kolap

This object-throwing game was observed being played in the Torres Strait on Mer Island in the nineteenth century. More recent versions have been observed. This version of an object-throwing game is a relay event. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: Bondi

The Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people had many water and diving games, which were often indulged in at any convenient creek, waterhole or at the beach. In various parts of Australia, contests in diving, floating, remaining beneath the water, and many other aquatic activities, were undertaken. They ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: bubu sagul

One of the many water games observed being played at Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait. A group of players run in a circle to form a whirlpool and then lie down and float. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous ...