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Listed under:  Language  >  Literature  >  Regional literature  >  Aboriginal literature
Audio

The creation of Trowenna

Different cultures around the world have their own creation stories, explaining how this planet and all the places on it were formed. These stories can tell us much about what is important to each culture. This story, from the Nuenonne people of Bruny Island, explains how Tasmania, known to them as Trowenna, was formed.

Audio

The Awabakal language of the Newcastle area

The Awabakal language, once common in the area now known as Newcastle, was almost 'lost'. It is being brought back to life using old texts and translations left by an early missionary. In this audio clip, listen to a discussion about the importance of reconstructing the Awabakal language and the challenges this poses.

Audio

Learning Dharug, Aboriginal language of Sydney

Imagine a time when the Aboriginal language Dharug was the official language spoken in the Sydney area. During this audio clip, reflect on how the language was considered almost 'lost', but (and) discover how Richard Green and others are piecing the Dharug language back together. Find out about how it is being taught at ...

Audio

Re-awakening Australian Aboriginal languages

Did you know that before colonisation there were about 250 distinct Aboriginal and Torres Strait lslander languages being spoken across Australia? Today, however, the majority of these languages are endangered. Listen to a number of significant Australians discussing the Aboriginal language situation in Australia today. ...

Moving Image

'The Be'

The stories we tell reveal a lot about our culture and what we value. Explore the story of the Be man, which comes from Dalabon country in the Northern Territory. This animated story is about two brothers who investigate a mysterious visitor to their home.

Audio

Noongar people speak about a sense of place

Some places hold special importance for us. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have a very strong sense of connection to their ancestral lands. They are important elements of their history and culture. In this audio clip, listen to two Noongar speakers talk about their connection to place.

Moving Image

Place as medicine

Many people feel a strong sense of connection to a particular place. The importance of this connection can't be underestimated. In her Heywire audio story, Nicolette Worth recounts how lost she was until she found a place to truly call home.<br /><br />To talk with someone about anxiety or depression visit www.headspace.org.au ...

Moving Image

'Namorrodor'

Animation is a relatively recent art form. Some might see it as strange to use animations to tell ancient stories, while others feel that this is a unique way to share such stories with a new generation. Watch this animation of 'Namorrodor' and explore your response to an old story told in a new way. Be aware that this ...

Audio

Hip hop against waste dump

Many hip hop artists have expressed concerns about the world through their music. The Northern Territory's Kylie Sambo is no exception. Listen to her protest against the construction of a nuclear waste dump on her people's lands in Muckaty, near Tennant Creek. Could you write or record a story about yourself and/or your ...

Audio

Living in the outback, coping with boarding school

For Timmy Watson, living in a remote community in the Northern Territory is as good as it gets. But there's one drawback: the need to go to boarding school during the final years of secondary school. Find out more in Timmy's Heywire audio story. Could you write or record a story about yourself and/or your community? The ...

Moving Image

Exploring Oodgeroo Noonuccal's poem 'Son of Mine'

Poetry has the power to evoke strong emotions in its audience. Oodgeroo Noonuccal, one of Australia's best known poets, was the first Aboriginal Australian to publish an anthology of poetry. Much of her poetry represents her experiences as an Aboriginal woman. In this clip, explore how the language of one of her most striking ...

Interactive resource

Making a difference: David Unaipon

Explore perspectives on Australia’s Indigenous heritage through photos and text about David Unaipon. Trace his story, including his work as an inventor, writer and public speaker. Examine how he promoted reconciliation between Indigenous peoples and other Australians. Investigate barriers he faced and how people reacted ...

Teacher resource

Taking a stand - Teacher idea

This Teacher idea shows how an extensive range of digital materials can be used to develop students’ critical literacy and writing skills, which then helps them to identify persuasive techniques that authors use. It includes a unit of work developed and trialled by a teacher.

Collection

Oodgeroo Noonuccal

This collection of 13 digital curriculum resources focuses on Oodgeroo Noonuccal (1920-93), renowned Indigenous poet, activist and artist. It is organised into four categories - her life; role as an activist; fame as a poet; and emergence as a visual artist. The collection includes photographs, a pamphlet, a leaflet, interviews, ...

Teacher resource

Shaping meaning in texts - unit of work

In this unit of work, students explore texts with an Aboriginal context in order to learn about how language choices and techniques shape meaning. They learn about autobiography as a form of writing, examine storytelling in words and images, and explore ways of positioning an audience for a particular purpose.

Collection

Embedding Indigenous perspectives across the curriculum

This website presents a range of professional learning and digital resources to support teachers in incorporating Indigenous perspectives across the curriculum. It provides resources that enable Australian teachers and students to value, understand and explore Indigenous cultures, languages, histories and stories.

Image

Dust jacket for 'We are going', 1964

This is a colour image of the dust jacket of 'We are going', a book of poetry by Kath Walker (later Oodgeroo Noonuccal) published in 1964. The relatively simple cover consists of a large black-and-white photograph of Walker superimposed on a red background.

Audio

John Collins recalls illustrations by Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker), 2007

This is an edited sound recording of John Collins, former managing director of the Brisbane-based book publisher Jacaranda Press, recalling the way the Indigenous poet Oodgeroo Noonuccal (then Kath Walker) produced illustrations for her 1980 book 'Father sky and mother earth'. He describes how a casual remark led to her ...

Audio

Brian Clouston describes the success of 'We are going', 2007

This is an edited sound recording of Brian Clouston, the founder of Brisbane-based Jacaranda Press, discussing the publication in 1964 of 'We are going', a book of poetry by Oodgeroo Noonuccal (known at the time as Kath Walker). Clouston describes the 'phenomenal' success of the book, and outlines why he believes it was ...

Video

Ten Canoes, 2006: Two brothers face payback

This clip shows canoeists returning to camp after hunting for goose eggs. The narrator (David Gulpilil) resumes the parallel story of Ridjimiraril (Crusoe Kurddal), a Dreaming story set in the ancient present. Ridjimiraril and Yeeralparil (James Gulpilil) face payback from a neighbouring tribe and are shown dancing to avoid ...