Search results

Refine results by

Year level
Resource type
Learning area

Refine by topic

Main topic Specific topic Related topic
Interactive resource

Aussie English for the beginner

This interactive resource allows students to explore the origins and meanings of common Australian words and idioms and to test their knowledge of Australian English. The definitions are provided by the Australian National Dictionary Centre and the cartoons are by David Pope.

Video

My Place - Episode 8: 1938: Colum, Punting

Colum and Thommo are collecting bets from their neighbours on horses in the 1938 Melbourne Cup. They present these bets to Mr O'Sullivan, the local shopkeeper. Colum and Thommo hope to win big in order to save Thommo's family from eviction.

Moving Image

The keys to clearer explanations

G'day cobber! Are you a true-blue, dinky-di Aussie? Australian slang can be quite bewildering for anyone who is new to this country and even for those who've lived here quite a while. In this clip Professor Kate Burridge explores how to use verbal and non-verbal language to explain difficult concepts.

Audio

Paul Hogan and Australian slang

Listen to Australian comic actor Paul Hogan talk to reporters in February 1987 about the Oscars and his role as Mick Dundee in the film 'Crocodile Dundee' (1986). Hogan played a laid-back outback survivalist in this hugely successful film, which is known for its use of Australian slang. Take note of Hogan's own use of Australian ...

Moving Image

One English language or many?

Do people around Australia all speak the same English? In this clip, explore the ways that language evolves and consider the impacts that other 'Englishes', such as British English and American English, can have on the way we speak.

Moving Image

What your language says about you

Do you know what a 'bevan' is? Or are you more familiar with 'bogans', 'westies', 'chiggers' or 'boonies'? These are all terms used to describe the same kind of person. How is it that different places in Australia develop different expressions? In this clip, explore some of the reasons behind Queensland's colloquialisms.

Moving Image

A song about snakes

Do you know any songs about Australian animals? Listen to this song about snakes performed by Don Spencer. Watch and listen, as the clip shows different types of snakes and even some trained people trying to catch a snake.

Moving Image

Chilling with the butcher's dog

Perhaps no term conjures the Australian character more than the ubiquitous 'G'day, mate'. But are Australians in danger of losing the colourful language they're known for? This clip examines some of the colloquialisms that might be in danger of disappearing.

Moving Image

Core speech with extras, thanks

A national survey in the 1960s indicated that the use of spoken English was surprisingly similar throughout Australia. This challenged the notion of 'regionalism', which suggested that people from different places would use language in different ways. In this clip, two leading academics discuss regionalism and suggest that ...

Moving Image

Pronunciation wars

How much attention must broadcasters pay to the pronunciation of words? Watch language experts and ABC staff discussing the preferred pronunciation of 'Don Quixote', a fictional Spaniard who appears in the novel bearing his name and in several significant artistic works. This clip reveals the importance placed upon the ...

Moving Image

Devon, Polony, Stras or Fritz?

How much is your use of the English language influenced by where you live? Would it be possible to work out where in Australia somebody comes from just by listening to them speak? In this clip from a 1975 episode of Four Corners, find out how words and expressions we use every day might be revealing more about us than we realise.

Moving Image

I speak, you guess

Listen to the voices of a small selection of students from around Australia to see if you can guess where they live. Is place the most important thing that shapes their language, or are there other factors that influence how people speak?

Moving Image

Pretty polly: how politicians speak

If politicians are the 'voice of the people', does their way of speaking resemble that of the people? In this clip from 1975, listen to Professor John S Gunn describe what he sees as a uniquely Australian rhythm of speech. Then see how many similarities and differences you can find as you listen to some brilliant imitations ...

Audio

Word on internet slang

Do your parents understand what you are saying in a text to your friends? LOL. The way we communicate and use technology affects the way we use language. The same message can be written differently on a computer screen or a phone screen. Mark McCrindle's book 'Word Up' tracks changes in language use due to online communications.

Interactive resource

Basketball clinic

Help a basketball team to practise shooting, passing and dribbling skills. Look at diagrams in a coaching manual. Use a model structure and sample phrases to build a set of instructions. Choose words that clearly describe actions and arrange them in sequence. For example, identify the first step in shooting as 'Face the ...

Video

'While there is still time', 1943 - part 2 of 11

This is an excerpt taken from a dramatised 1943 black-and-white war propaganda film titled 'While there is still time', made to persuade Australians at home to work and save for the war effort. This excerpt shows women who work in a munitions factory. The main character, Gracie Mason, says she will be taking the following ...

Video

The Adventures of Barry McKenzie, 1972: 'The occasional, odd chilled glass of amber fluid'

This clip shows Barry McKenzie (Barry Crocker) and his Aunt Edna (Barry Humphries) in separate encounters with their upper-class English relatives, the Gorts. It cuts between Barry, who has accompanied Sarah Gort (Jenny Tomasin) to a country ball, and Aunt Edna at home with Mr and Mrs Gort (Dennis Price and Avice Landone). ...

Video

Diggers, 1931: 'Hinky pinky parlay-voo'

This clip shows the final scenes from 'Diggers', a black-and-white film of 1931. It is the First World War and an Australian soldier farewells his French sweetheart (Eugenie Prescott) in her father's café in a French village. Soldiers march off to battle to a jaunty Australianised version of the song 'Mademoiselle from ...

Video

On Our Selection, 1920: Dave in love

This silent black-and-white clip shows Dave, who is in love, dancing excitedly in a paddock. Inside the hut the women of the family are sewing and ironing. Joe, Dave's younger brother, runs in and asks the question, shown by an intertitle, 'Mum, what's up with Dave?' The women are concerned and bring Dave back inside. Joe ...