Close message Scootle has stopped supporting resources that use the Adobe Flash plug-in from 18 Dec 2020. Learning paths that include these resources will have alerts to notify teachers and students that one or more of the resources will be unavailable. Click here for more info.

Search results

Video

Programming computers

Did you know you have to be very specific when you're programming computers to do something? Watch this video as David from UNSW explains why you have to be so exact when programming computers.

Video

How computers compute

Watch as Jamie Teherani from MIT, demonstrates how a big, mechanical computer made from wood works. What does it have in common with the high-tech computers of today?

Image

CSIRAC computer with Ron Bowles at the console, 1956

This is a black-and-white photograph showing Ron Bowles seated at the console of the CSIRAC computer in the Computation Laboratory at the University of Sydney. It was taken in June 1956.

Image

Replica 1 (clone of Apple 1) computer, 2006

This is a Replica 1 computer assembled in 2006. It is a clone of the Apple 1 computer released in 1976. The Replica 1 comprises an assembled printed circuit board mounted on an MDF base. It is pictured here with a manual, the cover of which reads in part: 'replica 1 / Setup and Users Manual / Revision C / January 2005'. ...

Image

CSIRAC's final switch off, 1964

This is a black-and-white photograph that shows Frank Hirst switching CSIRAC off for the last time in November 1964.

Image

CSIRAC computer and Trevor Pearcey, 1952

This is a black-and-white photograph of Trevor Pearcey in front of the CSIR Mk1 computer (later called CSIRAC), taken in Sydney on 5 November 1952.

Image

Apple Macintosh Plus computer, 1986

This is an Apple Macintosh Plus computer, pictured with a keyboard, mouse and carry bag.

Image

Dulmont laptop computer and accessories, Australia, 1985

This is a Dulmont Magnum laptop computer and case. The computer consists of a dark-green, rectangular plastic case. Two release buttons on either side allow the hinged top of the case to be raised, revealing the standard QWERTY keyboard (grey keys) and function keys (black) within the body of the case and an LCD screen ...

Image

Apple II computer, 1978

This is an Apple II computer pictured with a brown vinyl carry bag. The computer has a rainbow-coloured Apple logo, a beige moulded plastic case and a brown integrated keyboard. It is not pictured with a monitor. Included in the computer but not visible are a PAL television tuner card, floppy disk interface card, serial ...

Image

Apple Newton MessagePad personal digital assistant, 1993

This is an Apple Newton MessagePad - the first personal digital assistant (PDA). It comprises a tablet with a pressure-sensitive screen, a stylus and a protective cover. It is pictured with its case, retail packaging and handbook. The case has a label that reads in part 'Important Features / Handwriting Tips'.

Audio

Jurij Semkiw remembers Australia's first computer, 2006

This is an edited sound recording of 77-year-old Jurij Semkiw talking about Australia's first computer, known as CSIRAC (pronounced 'sigh-rack'), which ran its first simple program in 1949. Semkiw, who was a maintenance engineer on CSIRAC, describes the excitement of being involved in a completely new technology. He also ...

Image

Apple Lisa 2 computer modified to Macintosh XL, 1985

This is an Apple Lisa 2 personal computer system modified to be a Macintosh XL. It comprises a main console or 'box' with a built-in monitor, and an external keyboard, mouse and cables. Modifications to the standard Lisa 2 include the addition of a hard drive and the replacement of the 400 kB floppy drive with an 800 kB ...

Image

Roll of 12-hole paper tape used with CSIRAC, c1956

This is an example of 12-hole paper tape containing data that could be loaded into CSIRAC's memory using a 12-hole paper tape reader. this tape would have been used around 1956. CSIRAC was one of the world's first electronic digital stored program computers and is the last of the first generation to exist intact.

Image

CSIRAC computer and CSIRO team, 1958

This is a black-and-white photograph of the team from the CSIRO Division of Building Research with the CSIRAC computer. Pictured (from left to right) are Bill Davern, John Russell, Roy Muncey, Don Beresford, and Terry Holden. The three men in the centre are working at the console. The two on the right are working at the ...

Image

NorthStar Advantage personal computer, early 1980s

This is a NorthStar Advantage 8/16, an integrated personal computer with accessories and software. The computer has a plastic shell that is beige on the sides and brown at the front. There is a glass screen at front left and there are two floppy disk drives, one under the other, to the right. The built-in keyboard slopes ...

Image

CSIRAC's program preparation area, 1955-64

This is a photograph of programmer Don Beresford at a tape punch keyboard, part of the program preparation equipment for CSIRAC (previously CSIR Mk1). The keyboard was used to edit 12-hole paper tape. To Beresfordr's left is a spool of 12-hole paper tape; to his right is a tape-reader. CSIRAC was one of the world's first ...

Image

Paper tape reader for CSIRAC, c1956

This is a 12-hole paper tape reader used for loading programs (and data) into CSIRAC's memory around 1956. CSIRAC was one of the world's first electronic digital stored program computers and is the last of the first generation to exist intact.

Image

Apple PowerBook 100 computer, 1991

This is an Apple PowerBook 100 laptop computer, pictured with an external floppy disk drive, battery, high-speed data cable, a boxed accessory kit and the computer's original cardboard box packaging.

Image

Replica of the first computer mouse, 1967

This replica of the first computer mouse was produced by Logitech USA in 1999. Named the 'X-Y position indicator' by its inventor, the device was soon nicknamed a 'mouse' because its cord looked like a tail. It is 70 mm high, 110 mm wide and 85 mm deep.

Image

Operating console of CSIRAC, 1955-64

This is a 1964 photograph showing maintenance engineer Jurij Semkiw at the operating console of CSIRAC, Australia's first digital computer. CSIRAC, or 'Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Automatic Computer' was one of the world's first electronic digital stored program computers. It is the last of the first ...