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Are males better drivers than females?

In this unit of work students compare the reaction times of males and females. Students use mean, median, quartiles and graphs, including box and whisker plots, to compare datasets selected from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' CensusAtSchool website. Conclusions drawn from the investigation are to be presented to the ...

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Could the footprint belong to the person in the image?

This unit of work asks students to investigate the relationships between height and belly button height, and height and foot length. Statistical analysis of data accessed from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' CensusAtSchools website allows relationships to be investigated, interpreted and applied to solve a problem. ...

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Who am I? Body measurements

In this unit of work students investigate how four of their body measurements compare with those of their class members and with a sample of students from across Australia. Students record data in tables, calculate frequencies, construct histograms and calculate summary statistics - means, modes and medians - to determine ...

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The golden ratio

In this extension activity students investigate the relationship between belly button height and height. Students are required to access relevant data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' CensusAtSchool website and to use the features of a spreadsheet to determine a relationship. In the course of the investigation ...

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Time series data: road fatalities of 15-24 year olds

In this unit of work students investigate and comment on the changes and trends in road fatality rates for a 10-year period. They compare the data and trends for Australian states and territories using authentic data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Optional activities include smoothing and graphing data, as well ...

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Time series of height

In this activity students compile CensusAtSchool data to investigate the heights of students in years 7 to 11. They use a line graph to display their results and write a report of their findings.

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The effect of outliers on measures of centre

In this activity students use a random sample of data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' CensusAtSchool data collection to explore the effect of outliers on the mean, mode and median of a dataset relating to foot length. Students also reflect on situations in which it is appropriate to use these summary statistics.

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Data - Years 7 to 9

The 12 learning objects in this collection relate to the use, collection, display, comparison and interpretation of data. Objects in the first category, statistical data graphs, enable students to explore data using a range of graphical analysis tools. Objects in the second category, analysing surveys, enable students to ...

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What is 'typical'?

Students are asked to choose samples to check the accuracy of claims in a statistical report about 'typical' year 8 students. Samples include the students' classroom and ABS CensusAtSchools data. This unit of work supports the use of a spreadsheet to analyse a variety of continuous and categorical data. The resource includes ...

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Using Excel to calculate mean, median and mode

This activity outlines a step-by-step process for finding measures of the hours of sleep students tend to get on school nights using a spreadsheet.

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Using box plots to compare the heights of UK and Australian students

In this activity students describe the important features of a box plot. Using given data, they construct parallel box plots of heights of male and female students. They use the box plots to compare the heights of UK and Australian students and discuss their findings.

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Mean and standard deviation of belly button heights

Students use CAS calculator (or spreadsheet) technology to find a set of ten numbers having a given mean and standard deviation.

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Mean of belly button heights

In this activity, students use CensusAtSchool data on belly button heights, remove outliers and calculate the mean. Students create a realistic set of belly button heights for a given mean and write an explanation of their process.

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Parallel box and whisker plots of money earned

In this activity students use CensusAtSchool data to compare the money earned by two samples of students. They draw parallel box plots to display and interpret the data and report their conclusions. The resource includes a student worksheet.

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Middle value or value that appears most often?

You might have heard the terms median and mode. Do you get them mixed up? The median is the middle value. The mode is the value that appears most often. See how to work each out using a data set about goals scored in soccer matches.

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What's the mean number of goals scored?

The mean is the average of a data set. In this example of finding the mean, data is represented in a table. It shows the frequency of goals scored for 20 soccer matches. See how to find the mean, or average, number of goals scored.

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Dividing data into quartiles

Have you heard of a quartile when talking about data? Dividing the data into four equal sets gives you quartiles. Find out the term we use for the middle quartile. See what the special term is for the middle 50 per cent range of data. Lastly, see how to find values for these quartiles using a data set.

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The sweet interquartile range

Do you know how to find the interquartile range of frequency data? In this clip, see how it's done using data collected about numbers of sweets. The first step is to find Q1 (lower quartile) and then Q3 (upper quartile). Next watch how a cumulative frequency curve is used to find the interquartile range of grouped frequency ...

Interactive resource

Fix the matchbox machine: scoop size

Check whether a machine is packing most matchboxes with an acceptable number of matches (40–60 matches per box). Look at boxplots made after taking samples of 100 matchboxes. Analyse the data and identify whether results are within the tolerance range. Adjust the machine's scoop size (if needed) to make it work correctly. ...

Interactive resource

Fix the matchbox machine: speed

Check whether a machine is packing most matchboxes with an acceptable number of matches (40–60 matches per box). Look at boxplots made after taking samples of 100 matchboxes. Analyse the data and identify whether results are within the tolerance range. Adjust the machine's scoop size (if needed) to make it work correctly. ...