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Listed under:  History  >  Historical periods  >  Geological time
Moving Image

Oil from super-greenhouse events

Why did most of the world's oil deposits form at a specific prehistoric time? Learn how overheated super-greenhouse climates caused vast stretches of the world's oceans to stagnate and become depleted of oxygen. Discover the connection between these anoxic events and Earth's oil reserves. Watch scientists investigating ...

Collection

Dinosaur age

Visit the Mesozoic era. Discover fossil bones and tracks. See palaeontologists collect and study dinosaur fossils. Look out for fierce hunters like tyrannosaurs and giant plant-eating sauropods!

Video

'Tarbosaurus bataar', 2009

This is a video in which Museum Victoria's Brian Choo talks about what made 'Tarbosaurus bataar' a successful killer. The video was made as part of Museum Victoria's 'Dinosaur Walk' exhibition in 2009.

Video

Hadrosaur bone and skin fossils, 2009

This is a video in which Museum Victoria's Dave Pickering talks about the bone and skin fossils of a Hadrosaur, a duck-billed herbivorous dinosaur that belonged to the ornithopod group of dinosaurs. The video was made as part of Museum Victoria's 'Dinosaur Walk' exhibition in 2009.

StillImage

'Gallimimus bullatus'

This is a model skeleton of 'Gallimimus bullatus', an omnivorous dinosaur that measured 4-6 m in length and belonged in the group of dinosaurs known as ornithomimosaurs ('bird-mimicking dinosaurs').

StillImage

'Deinonychus antirrhopus'

This is a model skeleton of 'Deinonychus antirrhopus', a carnivorous dinosaur that measured 3-4 min length and belonged to the theropod group of dinosaurs.

StillImage

'Tarbosaurus bataar'

This is a model skeleton of a 'Tarbosaurus bataar', a carnivorous dinosaur that measured 8 m in length and belonged to the theropod group of dinosaurs.

Video

Hadrosaur fossil

This is a fossil from a hadrosaur, a duck-billed herbivorous dinosaur that was 12 m long and belonged to the ornithopod group of dinosaurs.

Video

'Tsintaosaurus spinorhinus'

This is a 'Tsintaosaurus spinorhinus', a herbivorous dinosaurthat was 10 m long and belonged to the ornithopod group of dinosaurs.

StillImage

'Hypsilophodon foxii'

This is a model skeleton of 'Hypsilophodon foxii', a herbivorous dinosaur that measured 1-2 min length and belonged to the ornithopod group of dinosaurs.

StillImage

'Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis'

This is a model skeleton of 'Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis', a herbivorous dinosaur which was 25 m long and belonged to the sauropod group of dinosaurs. There is also an associated website.

StillImage

'Amargasaurus cazaui'

This is a model skeleton of 'Amargasaurus cazaui', a herbivorous dinosaur which measured 12 m in length and belonged to the sauropod group of dinosaurs. There is also an associated website.

StillImage

'Talarurus plicatospineus'

This is a model skeleton of 'Talarurus plicatospineus', a herbivorous dinosaur that measured 5 m in length and belonged to the group of armoured dinosaurs and frilled dinosaurs.

StillImage

'Pteranodon sternbergi'

This is a model skeleton of 'Pteranodon sternbergi’, a flying reptile with a wingspan of 3 m. It was a member of the pterosaur group, carnivorous flying reptiles with skin-covered wings.

StillImage

'Quetzalcoatlus northropi'

This is a model skeleton of 'Quetzalcoatlus northropi', a member of the pterosaur group, carnivorous flying reptiles with skin-covered wings. It had a wingspan of 12 m.

StillImage

'Anhanguera blittersdorffi'

This is a model skeleton of 'Anhanguera blittersdorffi', a flying reptile with a wingspan of 4 m. It was a member of the pterosaur group, carnivorous flying reptiles with skin-covered wings.

StillImage

'Genyornis newtoni'

This is a model skeleton of 'Genyornis newtoni', a 2-m high, omnivorous, flightless bird. It belonged to the megafauna group, large land animals that evolved millions of years after the dinosaurs and included mammals, birds and reptiles.

StillImage

'Diprotodon optatum'

This is a model skeleton of a 'Diprotodon optatum newtoni’, a herbivorous marsupial that measured 3 m in length. It belonged to the megafauna group, large land animals that evolved millions of years after the dinosaurs and included mammals, birds and reptiles.

StillImage

Dr John Long, winner of science prize for Gogo fossil discovery in 2005

This photograph shows Dr John Long, who won the 2008 Australasian Science Prize for his discovery of a 375-million-year-old fossil and embryo in 2005.

StillImage

'Gogonasus' fossil discovery and animal evolution

This is a pictorial reconstruction of the now-extinct 'Gogonasus', an ancient fish whose discovery may have implications for the history of animal evolution.