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Listed under:  Language  >  Language conventions
Teacher resource

Teaching AC English

This is a resource for instructional leaders and teachers containing video vignettes and supporting text that demonstrate differentiation and explicit teaching of the Australian Curriculum: English in the areas of reading, spelling, punctuation and grammar across a range of classrooms from Foundation to year 10. The vignettes ...

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BBC Bitesize: compound sentences - revision

This is a series of four information sheets designed to teach students about phrases and clauses, sentence types and punctuation. It covers simple, complex and compound sentences. This resource is one of a series of online resources from the BBC's Bitesize collection.

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From possessive apostrophes to discombobulation!

People often worry about the use of apostrophes. See how Professor Kate Burridge answers a question about how to use the apostrophes after certain names, telling us how the rule has changed over time. She also explains the origins of the word 'discombobulate' and why the plural of house is not 'hice'.

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Study English: word families

Discover some simple ways to build your vocabulary and understand different parts of speech. In this clip, presenter Margot Politis unpacks a video report on electronic crime. You will learn how to build word families and recognise nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. You'll also get some tips on spelling.

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Study English: sentences and conjunctions

Improve your writing with a variety of compound and complex sentences. Discover some simple ways to connect ideas with conjunctions (words that join). In this clip, presenter Margot Politis unpacks a video report on a new, environmentally friendly solar house. You'll clear any confusion about conjunctions, clauses and commas.

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Subjunctivitis! Fact or 'Furphy'?

Why is 'were' used in 'If I were king' and what is the subjunctive? What do water sources and gossip have in common? If you don't know then you need to watch and listen as Professor Kate Burridge and Peter Rowsthorn explore these questions.

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Study English: recounts and opposites

Discover ways to talk and write about something that has happened in the past. Presenter Margot Politis unpacks a video in which a woman speaks of the time she had a medical emergency. You will gain some tips on forming compound and complex sentences. You'll also learn some common past tense verbs and some useful information ...

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Why do we say the words the way we do?

What kinds of things might influence the way we pronounce words in English? Professor Kate Burridge explains why knowing when 'kilometre' came into English helps us to understand why it is pronounced differently from similar words such as 'kilogram' and 'centimetre'. She also explains what it means to 'barrack' for a team.

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Words and sayings over time

Have you ever wondered where sayings like 'hanging by the skin of your teeth' come from? Professor Kate Burridge explains the origin and meaning of this saying. She also explains the opposite word (antonym) to 'misogynist' (someone who hates or has a long and deep prejudice against women) and the origins of the word 'goodbye'.

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Got or gotten? What a nightmare!

Words have a history. Knowing their history helps us to understand what they mean and why some people use them in different ways. Professor Kate Burridge explains how the use of the past tense of the verb 'get' (gotten) has changed, but is still in use by many people. She also discusses the history of the word 'nightmare'.

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Plum puddings, yelks to yolks and elfs to elves

Why are Christmas puddings called 'plum puddings' when they have no plums in them? How did the egg yolk get its name and why are the plurals for 'hoof' and 'roof' are spelt differently? Find out how Professor Kate Burridge answers these questions that the audience of 'Wise Words' send in for her.

Interactive Resource

BBC Skillswise: What are word types?

This is a multilayered resource about the following word types: nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, connectives, prepositions and pronouns. It includes a video set in the workplace, two factsheets and four worksheets that provide an explanation of various word types and exercises in identifying and using them, and two multiple ...

Assessment resource

Wonderful words: pets: assessment

Test your ability to create lively sentences by selecting the most appropriate words. For example, view animations of a cat and a fish. Next, add appropriate adjectives and adverbs to two simple sentences about them to make the sentences more lively. Select a suitable connecting word or phrase to join your two lively sentences. ...

Assessment resource

Wonderful words: beach: assessment

Test your ability to create lively sentences by selecting the most appropriate words. For example, view animations of a boy and a girl on the beach. Next, add appropriate adjectives and adverbs to two simple sentences about them to make the sentences more lively. Select a suitable connecting word or phrase to join your ...

Assessment resource

Wonderful words: food: assessment

Test your ability to create lively sentences by selecting the most appropriate words. For example, view animations of a chef and a diner. Next, add appropriate adjectives and adverbs to two simple sentences about them to make the sentences more lively. Select a suitable connecting word or phrase to join your two lively ...

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Create interesting writing

This collection of 16 digital curriculum resources provides activities and ideas to develop students' writing skills. It includes focused interactive activities to improve students' writing and to help them to engage audience interest through the use of effective adjectives, adverbs, verbs, metaphors, similes and plot structures. ...

Interactive Resource

BBC Skillswise: sentence structure - make a sentence

This is a game in which students construct sentences that make sense, have a verb, start with a capital letter and end with appropriate punctuation. Students choose the correct phrase from five options, then add it to a stem to make it a complete sentence. This resource is one of a series of online resources from the BBC's ...

Interactive Resource

Verbi

This is a collection of Italian language resources focusing on the formation and use of regular verbs with the endings '-are', '-ire' and '-ere'; auxiliary verbs ('avere' and 'essere'); and other common irregular verbs in the present, gerund and present perfect tenses. It includes modal verbs, idiomatic expressions with ...

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Word histories: how extraordinary!

Words can change over time and so can their meanings. The word 'extra' broke away from other words to become a word on its own. Professor Kate Burridge explains how this impacts on words like 'extraordinary'. She also explains the origins and meanings of the words 'hearse' and 'rehearse''.

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Challenging grammar rules, darlings and crowbars

Find out that what appears to be a straightforward grammar rule behind the use of the words 'fewer' and 'less' may not be as straightforward as it seems! Professor Kate Burridge explains that this grammar rule has been under challenge for centuries. She also explains the origins of the word 'darling' and why the 'crow' ...