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Listed under:  Language  >  Language proficiency
Teacher resource

English as an Additional Language: Science Language Literacy Pilot Project

This teacher resource describes a pilot project in which selected Victorian science teachers learnt functional and systemic pedagogical strategies to support English as an Additional Language (EAL) students to understand and use science literacy genres. Organised in nine sections: Summary; Target student group; Method; ...

Teacher resource

Making the links: literacy across learning areas in secondary school settings

This teacher resource describes a collaborative learning strategy sponsored by the Catholic Education Office of Western Australia to improve the ways literacy across the curriculum is perceived and taught. The strategy was implemented in up to nine schools and involved six mentor teachers, 70 teachers and 600 students. ...

Video

My Place - Episode 5: 1968: Sofia, Speaking the language

Sofia and her friend Mareka are watching Professor Julius Sumner Miller's television science show, 'Why is it so?', when Janice arrives and meets Sofia's mother and grandmother. She needs Sofia to translate the conversation and Sofia deliberately tells each party a wrong translation.

Video

'Mary and Max', 2009

These two clips come from the Australian claymation feature film 'Mary and Max' about the friendship between two different but lonely people. Max and Mary become penpals and live across two continents, Mary in Australia and Max in New York. The first clip focuses on the misfortune that meets Max when his airconditioner ...

Video

Vietnamese refugees and their children's future

This clip explores how the children of Vietnamese refugees can feel a strong sense of obligation and responsibility because the refugee generation 'laid out its body as a bridge' for them 'to walk over'. Helen Huynh describes how her parents' sacrifices made it essential that she succeed in her studies. She tells of the ...

Interactive Resource

Inanimate Alice episode 2: Italy

Inanimate Alice is a multimodal text that uses audio, animation and interactive elements to tell a story about a girl who is growing up in the early years of the 21st century. In episode 2, Alice is separated from her parents while they are on a skiing holiday in Italy.

Interactive Resource

Inanimate Alice episode 3: Russia

Inanimate Alice is a multimodal text that uses audio, animation and interactive elements to tell a story about a girl who is growing up in the early years of the 21st century. In episode 3, Alice and her parents are living in Russia; Alice hides in her cupboard while her parents argue with some angry strangers in the next room.

Interactive Resource

Inanimate Alice episode 4: hometown

Inanimate Alice is a multimodal text that uses audio, animation and interactive elements to tell a story about a girl who is growing up in the early years of the 21st century. In episode 4, Alice finds herself trapped on top of a building when a staircase collapses.

Teacher resource

Indigenous Australians: early vocabularies

This is a multilayered resource about the early vocabularies of the Australian Indigenous languages. The resource presents four vocabulary lists from different regions across Australia that were compiled by early European settlers and visitors. Links provide access to the vocabulary lists. The lists are presented as notebooks ...

Audio

Autobiography of a flood survivor

Imagine if the town or suburb you live in came under threat due to a natural disaster. How would you react? Shelby Garlick from Kerang, Victoria, was a finalist of the 2012 Heywire storytelling competition for young people. Listen to her inspiring story and explore the lessons she learnt as a result of working with her ...

Moving Image

Shakespeare words: the process of language change

Imagine being responsible for inventing over 1700 words! That is the legacy of William Shakespeare, one of the greatest writers in the English language. Most of these words were created through translations of Latin words or by combining words with prefixes and suffixes in original ways. In this clip, you'll discover the ...

Moving Image

Conquest: the process of language change

When the Normans conquered England in 1066, they brought a lot more than fancy clothes and castles; they also brought the French language. Discover the impact that this momentous event continues to have today.

Moving Image

Naming words: significant social effects

The names we give people and places hold great significance for us. But have you ever thought about how this simple act can impact on others? Naming is a powerful tool. Watch this clip as Professor Kate Burridge explains the ways that language can have significant social effects.

Moving Image

Borrowed words: the processes of language change

Do you know any words from another language? Chances are, you know more than you think you do! English is a polyglot language; one that borrows words from other languages. In this Professor Kate Burridge discusses the origins of the phrases 'short-shrift' and 'lily-livered'.

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New meanings: the processes of language change

Have you ever engaged in a bit of argle-bargle? It's the original form of a colloquialism you might be more familiar with: argy-bargy. But where does this phrase come from? Etymology is the study of the history and evolution of words. In this clip Professor Kate Burridge explains the origins of this curious phrase and other words.

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Golly gosh, what do those sayings mean?

Have you ever wondered where sayings like 'golly gosh', 'by gum' or 'drat' come from? In this video, Professor Kate Burridge explains the origins and meaning of these and other sayings. She also explains the history of the pronoun 'you'.

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Subjunctivitis! Fact or 'Furphy'?

Why is 'were' used in 'If I were king' and what is the subjunctive? What do water sources and gossip have in common? If you don't know then you need to watch and listen as Professor Kate Burridge and Peter Rowsthorn explore these questions.

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Efficient speech: the process of language change

Wassup, bro?Well 'pparently I ain't speakin' right.Will thou ha' the truth on't?We often think that only young people speak in abbreviated forms, but the truth is people have been doing this since Anglo-Saxon times! In this clip discover with Professor Kate Burridge some words that belong to the 'zero plurals' group, why ...

Audio

Evolving English: the role of social media

How many times have you heard teenagers berated for using the term 'like'? Yet this term has existed at least since 1586 when the term, 'Yon man is like out of his mind' was written into history. The truth is, our language is constantly evolving, with new words added, others dying off and some resurfacing again. In this ...

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Using and understanding words in context

Have you ever noticed that certain words are relevant to particular topics or contexts? View this clip to find out ten words associated with shearing and the sheep industry.