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Listed under:  Language  >  Language modes  >  Creating texts  >  Literary styles
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Tension in the air

In this Heywire audio story, explore how Marguerite Donaldson builds tension as she recounts a nerve-wracking incident that happened while she was flying one day. Find out what this incident has revealed to her and how she shares her thoughts. Could you write or record a similar story about yourself and/or your community? ...

Audio

Autobiography of a flood survivor

Imagine if the town or suburb you live in came under threat due to a natural disaster. How would you react? Shelby Garlick from Kerang, Victoria, was a finalist of the 2012 Heywire storytelling competition for young people. Listen to her inspiring story and explore the lessons she learnt as a result of working with her ...

Audio

How did Mem Fox write the words in 'Possum Magic'?

Can you remember the picture books that you used to read when you were very young? One of Australia's most loved picture books is 'Possum Magic'. Can you believe that it took the author, Mem Fox, five years to write the 512 words in the book? She wrote the first paragraph 23 times! Listen to this interview, presented by ...

Audio

The creation of Trowenna

Different cultures around the world have their own creation stories, explaining how this planet and all the places on it were formed. These stories can tell us much about what is important to each culture. This story, from the Nuenonne people of Bruny Island, explains how Tasmania, known to them as Trowenna, was formed.

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Vanishing words: the process of language change

The English language is full of strange contradictions and vanishing words. Have you ever wondered why we sometimes put words together that contradict each other, such as 'pretty awful' or 'terribly good'? If we can be 'ruthless', can we be 'ruthly' as well? Watch as Professor Kate Burridge explains these curious irregularities ...

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Shakespeare words: the process of language change

Imagine being responsible for inventing over 1700 words! That is the legacy of William Shakespeare, one of the greatest writers in the English language. Most of these words were created through translations of Latin words or by combining words with prefixes and suffixes in original ways. In this clip, you'll discover the ...

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Borrowed words: the processes of language change

Do you know any words from another language? Chances are, you know more than you think you do! English is a polyglot language; one that borrows words from other languages. In this Professor Kate Burridge discusses the origins of the phrases 'short-shrift' and 'lily-livered'.

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The importance of stories in video games

What do you expect from a great video game? Lots of action and adventure? Amazing graphics? Exciting battles? It seems that these days more and more gamers are answering this question with, 'A great story'. In this clip, discover how the concept of narrative is becoming crucial to the evolution of video games.

Audio

Michael Leunig's duck: a conversation

Have you ever had a sudden burst of inspiration and wondered where it came from? That was the case for Michael Leunig, well-known Australian cartoonist, writer, artist and philosopher. Sometimes ideas come to us in abstract ways, as symbols. In this audio clip, Leunig explains the symbolism behind his now famous 'direction-finding ...

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Hugh Howey's 'Wool': interactive publishing

Science fiction as a genre is known for exploring new frontiers. 'Wool' by Hugh Howey achieves this both in the way it was written and in its publication. Learn more about this fascinating story and the implications it might have for the future of novel writing. Jennifer Byrne's panellists from left to right are: China ...

Audio

Writing a scientist's journal

Imagine you are a scientist who discovered a prehistoric animal in one of Australia's harshest environments. This is what happened to Dr Nick Murphy, an evolutionary biologist from La Trobe University. He was very excited to discover several new species of crustaceans living in desert springs near Lake Eyre. Learn about ...

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Understanding satire: the 'ocker' Australian

What do 'Borat', 'The Simpsons', 'Gulliver's Travels' and political cartoons have in common? They are all forms of satire: a particularly tricky genre of text. In this clip, explore the concept of satire and how it is constructed.

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Primary school kids embrace the Bard

William Shakespeare is probably the most famous writer in the English language. Along with staging Shakespeare's plays for audiences around Australia, the Bell Shakespeare Company visits schools to introduce 'the Bard's materpieces' to students. Find out how it all works when host Julia Baird and The Drum panellists talk ...

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Modern day epic poetry

Imagine being a troubadour, travelling poet or musician. In medieval times these people wandered the countryside, earning a living by recounting great tales of heroic feats. Young British poet Kate Tempest is doing much the same today. In this clip, explore Kate's fascinating work.

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A look at author Bob Graham's books

Books by the Australian children's author Bob Graham have a very individual and recognisable style. Find out why his work is featured in the Lu Rees Australian Children's Literature Archive housed in Canberra. Identify some of the features that characterise his work.

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Social satire: David Williamson's 'After the Ball'

Imagine having your family history played out on stage for audiences to experience. That's what happened with David Williamson, whose 1997 play 'After the Ball' is based on his own childhood. However, Williamson is known for his keen-eyed depiction of Australian society. In this clip, explore the motivations behind this ...

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Salman Rushdie: breaking story-writing rules

Have you ever had the experience of being taught the 'rules' of story writing and then gone on to read one that seems to break every one of those rules? Are there really any rules to story writing? In this clip, discover why renowned author Salman Rushdie experiments with narrative conventions.

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Understanding science fiction

What if ...? This is one of the fundamental questions a writer asks, and it's the question that science fiction specialises in imagining. In this clip, explore the science fiction genre and learn more about the questions it poses. Listen as two experts discuss their interpretations of the meaning of science fiction.

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The spoken word: Rap artist Sage Francis

What role do social issues play in popular music? While some rap music glorifies 'gangster' culture, many artists use it to express their views about things that concern them. One such artist is Sage Francis. In this clip, discover how this rap battle champion uses his art to explore important and controversial social issues.

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Richard Flanagan - being a courageous writer

Whether we realise it or not, we are all storytellers. Every day we compose text messages, write emails or tell stories to friends and family. Yet when we are asked to write a story and share it with others, many of us find the process terrifying. This can sometimes be the case for published authors too. In this clip, discover ...