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First shop in the world - mathematics activities

This photograph may well be of either the first or the last shop in the world! The scene could motivate thinking and research on geographic location and distance measures on the Earth's surface. This photograph leads naturally to the need for a location reference system, hence latitude and longitude. Other ways (eg trigonometric ...

StillImage

Astronomical regulator clock - Charles Frodsham, 1865

This is an eight-day astronomical regulator clock made by Charles Frodsham and Co. of London in 1865.

Image

Chronometer from SS 'Grace Darling', 1907

This is a 1907 brass and steel chronometer in a square mahogany case. It has a glass-covered dial and gold hands. The maker's name, 'Clerke, Maker to the Royal Navy', and address, 'Royal Exchange London', are written across the centre of the dial. The chronometer measures 17.5 cm in diameter and is 19.5 cm deep.

Moving Image

Travel the seas

This is a video resource describing the use of nautical charts for navigation at sea. The video explains what nautical charts are and how to use them, using authentic charts to point out important features. The video uses animation to explain the coordinate system based on latitude and longitude. It emphasises that coastlines ...

Interactive Resource

Charles Darwin - The Australian Connection

This is a multilayered website about Charles Darwin and his important scientific expedition aboard the HMS Begale that included a visit to Australia. The website has interactive sections on Darwin’s journey, understanding weather, using longitude, evolution timeline, and coral reefs. The home page has a series of short ...

Collection

James Cook - finding your way

If you decide to visit somewhere you've never been before, how do you find your way? If you're in a car, the driver might use a GPS. You might use a smartphone app to give you directions. Perhaps you might go really ‘old school' and use a printed map or street directory. But how did explorers navigate their way around the ...