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Listed under:  Language  >  Language conventions  >  Register (Language)
Interactive resource

Aussie English for the beginner

This interactive resource allows students to explore the origins and meanings of common Australian words and idioms and to test their knowledge of Australian English. The definitions are provided by the Australian National Dictionary Centre and the cartoons are by David Pope.

Video

My Place - Episode 8: 1938: Colum, Punting

Colum and Thommo are collecting bets from their neighbours on horses in the 1938 Melbourne Cup. They present these bets to Mr O'Sullivan, the local shopkeeper. Colum and Thommo hope to win big in order to save Thommo's family from eviction.

Interactive Resource

Languages online: Chinese part 01: greetings

This set of interactive activities from the Languages online resource encourages students to distinguish different aspects of greetings in Chinese. The activities cover different levels of politeness, using singular and plural forms, greeting at different times of the day and common responses to a greeting. Student skills ...

Interactive Resource

Languages online: Chinese part 02: asking name and age

This set of interactive activities from the Languages online resource encourages students to distinguish different aspects of asking people's names and ages. The activities cover different levels of politeness, using different gender and age terminology, and learning the order of Chinese names. Student activities include ...

Interactive Resource

Languages online: Chinese part 04: talking about your family

This set of interactive activities from the Languages online resource encourages students to engage in social interactions by talking about their family. The activities cover introducing and asking about family members, learning culturally specific forms and reinforcing past learning experiences such as asking ages as a ...

Text

BBC Bitesize: text types - revision

This is a collection of seven information sheets about the differences between fiction and non-fiction writing, emphasising the characteristics of several different genres in each, including prose, poetry and drama, and information, recount, instruction, explanation, persuasion and argument texts. Descriptions and examples ...

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The keys to clearer explanations

G'day cobber! Are you a true-blue, dinky-di Aussie? Australian slang can be quite bewildering for anyone who is new to this country and even for those who've lived here quite a while. In this clip Professor Kate Burridge explores how to use verbal and non-verbal language to explain difficult concepts.

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Subjunctivitis! Fact or 'Furphy'?

Why is 'were' used in 'If I were king' and what is the subjunctive? What do water sources and gossip have in common? If you don't know then you need to watch and listen as Professor Kate Burridge and Peter Rowsthorn explore these questions.

Audio

An interview with Lady Mary Fairfax (1973)

Lady Mary Fairfax was president of the Australian Opera Foundation. In this interview she talks about a formal ball held in her home to celebrate the opening of the Sydney Opera House in 1973. Listen to the interview, which outlines the menu, entertainment and security arrangements.

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Public speaking

How do you feel about making a speech in public? If you think it's pretty scary you're not alone. Find out ways to make speaking in public easier. See how some students have gone about it, using the movie 'The King's Speech' as inspiration.

Audio

Paul Hogan and Australian slang

Listen to Australian comic actor Paul Hogan talk to reporters in February 1987 about the Oscars and his role as Mick Dundee in the film 'Crocodile Dundee' (1986). Hogan played a laid-back outback survivalist in this hugely successful film, which is known for its use of Australian slang. Take note of Hogan's own use of Australian ...

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One English language or many?

Do people around Australia all speak the same English? In this clip, explore the ways that language evolves and consider the impacts that other 'Englishes', such as British English and American English, can have on the way we speak.

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What your language says about you

Do you know what a 'bevan' is? Or are you more familiar with 'bogans', 'westies', 'chiggers' or 'boonies'? These are all terms used to describe the same kind of person. How is it that different places in Australia develop different expressions? In this clip, explore some of the reasons behind Queensland's colloquialisms.

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A song about snakes

Do you know any songs about Australian animals? Listen to this song about snakes performed by Don Spencer. Watch and listen, as the clip shows different types of snakes and even some trained people trying to catch a snake.

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Chilling with the butcher's dog

Perhaps no term conjures the Australian character more than the ubiquitous 'G'day, mate'. But are Australians in danger of losing the colourful language they're known for? This clip examines some of the colloquialisms that might be in danger of disappearing.

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Is it today or tomorrow?

Discover all you need to know about today and tomorrow from the expert who knows everything. Don't wait until tomorrow if you have time today. You must watch this clip now, before today becomes yesterday!

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The mystery of his and her tissue paper

Prepare to be amazed, as Ian the magician performs a surprising trick with two pieces of tissue paper. Rachel's is yellow and Steven's is green. Keep your eyes on the tissue so you don't confuse hers with his.

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Core speech with extras, thanks

A national survey in the 1960s indicated that the use of spoken English was surprisingly similar throughout Australia. This challenged the notion of 'regionalism', which suggested that people from different places would use language in different ways. In this clip, two leading academics discuss regionalism and suggest that ...

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Pronunciation wars

How much attention must broadcasters pay to the pronunciation of words? Watch language experts and ABC staff discussing the preferred pronunciation of 'Don Quixote', a fictional Spaniard who appears in the novel bearing his name and in several significant artistic works. This clip reveals the importance placed upon the ...

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Devon, Polony, Stras or Fritz?

How much is your use of the English language influenced by where you live? Would it be possible to work out where in Australia somebody comes from just by listening to them speak? In this clip from a 1975 episode of Four Corners, find out how words and expressions we use every day might be revealing more about us than we realise.