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Drama / Year 7 and 8

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Identify and connect specific features and purposes of drama from contemporary and past times to explore viewpoints and enrich their drama making, starting with drama in Australia and including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACADRR046)

Elaborations
  • identifying the social, historical and cultural contexts of the forms and styles represented in their drama
  • locating and exploring specific examples of contemporary Australian, Asian and other world drama
  • describing the role of drama in different cultures and using this information when they plan their own drama
  • Considering viewpoints – contexts: For example – What is the cultural context in which the drama was developed, or in which it is viewed, and what does it signify? How does this drama relate to its social context and that of its makers and audiences? What are the appropriate protocols for viewing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander drama and other culturally specific performance? What historical forces and influences are evident in the drama? How does this style of drama vary from those seen in other traditions and other parts of the world?
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
Cross-curriculum priorities
ScOT terms

Settings (Narratives),  Artistic purpose,  Aboriginal art,  Australian art,  Torres Strait Islander art

Video

Developing script ideas with Hannie Rayson

How do you come up with ideas to write about? Watch this clip to find out how Australian playwright and screenwriter Hannie Rayson begins her writing process. She begins with a "big question" - if you were writing a play, what big question would you ask?

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Hannie Rayson on the Australian voice in theatre

How important do you think it is to hear Australian stories told on stage? Listen as Hannie Rayson explains her early beliefs about where great drama comes from. After watching this clip, try writing a dramatic scene that takes place at a family barbeque.

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Hannie Rayson on writing complex roles for women

Watch as Hannie Rayson describes her early desire to write multidimensional, complex roles for women in her plays. What was this in response to?  Why is it important for audiences to see female characters as well as male characters driving drama in plays? 

Video

Alexander Dick: 'Tea service' c. 1828

Alexander Dick was one of the few professional silversmiths operating in Sydney Town in the 1820s. He immigrated to Sydney in 1824 as a free settler; however, he was later convicted of receiving stolen silver and was shipped to Norfolk Island for four years, an Island owned by the British at this time off the coast of the ...

Video

Conrad Martens: 'View from Rose Bank' 1840

Many early artists romanticised the Australian colonial landscape and did not always strictly paint what they saw. In this example Martens has given the landscape a decidedly Italian atmosphere, softening the colour palate and creating a more ‘civilised' view. Can you think of why the artist may be interested in changing ...

Video

What most figures in Boyd's paintings?

Australian artist Arthur Boyd (1920-1999) has contributed a huge amount to Australian art, says former director of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Edmund Capon. Hear Capon's view that, although many of Boyd's paintings are of Australian landscapes, the focus is more on the people within them, and about Boyd's own thoughts ...

Video

Competing in the dance

Stompin, a Tasmanian-based youth dance company, created a performance based around the idea of competition - with the input of the dancers as well as their families. 'On Your Marks' also took into consideration the space where the dance was to be performed. In this clip, listen to one of the choreographers discussing how ...

Video

Dancing the Torres Strait winds to life: Kuki

Inspired by the natural environment, Torres Strait Islander choreographer Elma Kris created the dance 'About' as an expression of the effects that the winds (Gub) have on the land, sea and community. This clip shows the segment 'Kuki' (pronounced Cook-ee), which is inspired by the strong north-west winds that blow between ...

Video

Arthur Merric Boyd: 'Gathering seaweed before the storm, Sandringham beach' 1900

Arthur Boyd's interest in seeking to capture the effects of light on water is demonstrated here. How does he convey the impression of an approaching storm? How do you think painting outdoors influences the use of light and colour he uses in his art?

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Eugene von Guerard: 'North-east view from the northern top of Mount Kosciusko' 1863

In this landscape Eugene von Guérard blends topographical accuracy with the grandness of a mountain top view which he witnessed in 1862 as a member of a geographical survey led by scientist Georg von Neumayer. The artist has taken some liberties with the depiction of the boulders in the foreground to demonstrate the enormous ...

Video

Street art has its space

In 2011 Cockatoo Island in Sydney Harbour, once the home of convicts and shipbuilding, was the venue for the Outpost Project, a vast collection of international and Australian artists making and exhibiting legal urban and street art.

Video

What if Indigenous Australians were the majority?

Imagine an Australia in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples made up the vast majority of the population. See Bidjara artist Michael Cook discussing his most recent exhibition, 'Majority Rule', which is based upon this engaging 'what if' question.

Video

John Glover: 'Mr Robinson's house on the Derwent, Van Diemen's Land' c. 1838

Artists were often captivated by their first glimpse of the Australian landscape and portrayed the countryside with a sense of wonder. This example by John Glover includes trees with curled branches, brightly lit skies and colour infused hills. How does this image compare to others you have seen of this period?

Video

Can robots draw?

On 26 September 2013, Viennese artist Alex Kiessling created three artworks simultaneously in three European cities. While he was drawing in one city, robots were replicating his marks on paper in two distant cities.<br /><br />Watch the clip to see Kiessling and the robots drawing at the same time.

Video

John Eyre: (print after) 'Port Jackson Harbour NSW' 1812

This panoramic view of Port Jackson shows the fledgling European settlement taking shape. Part of a set of 12, this print was drawn by convict artist John Eyre who was transported for breaking and entering. The intended clientele included local trading ships and members of the British military and naval forces. The series ...

Video

iArt: photography on our mobile phones

What is a 'mobile phone artist'? It is becoming more common for art galleries to hold exhibitions of photography taken exclusively with a mobile phone. In this clip, this emerging trend in the art world and on the internet is considered.

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John Glover: 'Patterdale landscape with cattle' c. 1833

John Glover migrated to Tasmania in 1831, arriving on his 64th birthday. He is considered one of Australia's most important artists of the early 19th century and the colonial period. This piece was one of the first he completed after taking up a land grant in Patterdale on the Nile River. The pastoral scene depicts the ...

Video

'The Rajah quilt' 1841

The Rajah quilt was made by female convicts on route from England to the colony of Tasmania in 1841. It consists of 2815 pieces of fabric and was presented to the Governor's wife upon arrival as a testament to the women's industry. The women learned these skills on the long journey to Australia on board their convict ship ...

Video

Making the didgeridu: inspiration and culture

Artist Frankie Lane learnt traditional didgeridu-making skills from an uncle. For him it is important in turn to pass on the knowledge and skills he has learnt. Find out some fascinating details about how Lane, who comes from Beswick (Wugularr) in the Northern Territory, creates a didjeridu.

Video

Mervyn Street: painting the old days

Imagine growing up on the land, working with horses and cattle, camping out and learning the skills of a stockman. Mervyn Street remembers his youth as a time full of fun. He is a Gooniyandi man who was born on Louisa Downs Station near Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia. An accomplished artist, he depicts his memories ...