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Listed under:  Society  >  Culture  >  Recreation  >  Games  >  Chasey
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Yulunga: paliwan

Hide-and-seek constituted a series of very commonly played games, even by adults. In some games either a person or thing was hidden. The Kokominni people in the northwest of Queensland had a game called paliwan, a version of hide-and-seek. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians ...

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Yulunga: edor

This version of a chasing-and-tagging game originates in the Aurukun Aboriginal community and has been popular and played for as long as most can remember. This game has been frequently played around the streets, in the school at break time and before physical education lessons as a fun warm-up activity. The enthusiasm ...

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Yulunga: giriga

A duck ‘catching’ game was played by little boys and girls at Cape Bedford, Cooktown and the McIvor regions in north Queensland. This game was recorded by Walter Roth in the early 1900s. This is a role-play, running-and-chasing tag game suitable for younger children. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was ...

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Yulunga: emu

This game is based on a chasing game observed being played by Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory in more recent times. This is a chasing and catching (tag) game. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous ...

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Yulunga: marutchi

Marutchi or black swan was a water game played by the Jagara (or Jagera) people in the Brisbane area. It was often played among inhabitants from different areas. Some of the players were very clever and could avoid being caught. If a player became tired he or she could be replaced by another player. Spectators were not ...

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Yulunga: Gitja

The Gitga (moon) play game from the north Queensland area was usually played when a number of children gathered together. The full version of the game observed involved imitation and acting aspects along with a running-and-chasing activity. This is a chasing-and-catching (tag) game. It is a simplified version of a more ...

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Yulunga: Munhanganing

The game of Munhanganing was played by children of the Arnhem Land area in northern Australia. Children played this, and other running games, in the flickering lights from firebrands of the grownups, sitting about a camp site. A running-and-chasing team game in which players attempt to touch players on the opposing team. ...

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Yulunga: Wanambi

Wanambi was a large snake. This game was observed being played by the Pitjantjatjara people of central Australia. This is a chase-and-tag game. Players in a line move towards another player, who suddenly chases and attempts to catch (touch) them. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide ...

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Yulunga: birray

Young children in the Bloomfield area of north Queensland played the game of birray (march-fly). It was observed by Walter Roth in the early 1900s. This is a game where a chaser (birray) attempts to tag (touch) other players. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with ...

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Yulunga: tabud nuri

A game of tag observed being played on Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait by Margaret Lawrie. It is a group activity that is suitable for younger players. Players in a line coil and uncoil like a snake before a player is chased by other players, who attempt to touch (catch) him or her. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...