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English / Year 2 / Literature / Responding to literature

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Identify aspects of different types of literary texts that entertain, and give reasons for personal preferences (ACELT1590)

Elaborations
  • describing features of texts from different cultures including recurring language patterns, style of illustrations, elements of humour or drama, and identifying the features which give rise to their personal preferences
  • connecting the feelings and behaviours of animals in anthropomorphic stories with human emotions and relationships
  • drawing, writing and using digital technologies to capture and communicate favourite characters and events
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Personal responses,  Imaginative texts

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