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English / Year 10 / Literature / Responding to literature

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Reflect on, extend, endorse or refute others’ interpretations of and responses to literature (ACELT1640)

Elaborations
  • determining, through debate, whether a text possesses universal qualities and remains relevant
  • presenting arguments based on close textual analysis to support an interpretation of a text, for example writing an essay or creating a set of director’s notes
  • creating personal reading lists in a variety of genres and explain why the texts qualify for inclusion on a particular list
  • reflecting upon and asking questions about interpretations of texts relevant to a student’s cultural background
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Personal responses,  Reasoning

Interactive

Writing a discussion

The resource contains information, activities and tasks on how to write a discussion. It includes writing and publishing templates for students for a variety of purposes and contexts. This resource supports the Australian Curriculum in English K–10.

Interactive

Syllabus bites – responding to literature

A web page with information, teacher guides and resources on responding to texts. This resource supports the NSW English K-10 syllabus.

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Books as a source of debate

Imagine a world destroyed by cataclysm, where you were left to wander through an ash-coated landscape populated by thieves, murderers and even cannibals. That's the vision offered by Cormac McCarthy's 2006 novel 'The road'. Dystopian fiction can often be bleak and pessimistic in terms of the view of humanity it offers readers. ...

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'The Tempest': Shakespeare's farewell?

'The Tempest' is believed by some to be Shakespeare's final play. With this in mind, could Prospero in some ways represent Shakespeare himself? If so, Prospero's epilogue at the end of the play takes on a new and poignant resonance. John Bell discusses the themes of giving up and letting go with Bell Shakespeare's James ...

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'The Tempest': set free at last?

The epilogue in 'The Tempest' signals Prospero's acknowledgment that his time is over. He has given up his powers and seeks to return to Naples to live out the rest of his days. John Bell of Bell Shakespeare delivers Prospero's farewell directly to camera in a powerful and evocative plea for release.

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Lady Macbeth: the power of deadly persuasion

After considering the matter carefully, Macbeth decides not to carry out the plan to murder King Duncan. Until, that is, he is persuaded to by his wife. Lady Macbeth is a fascinating character. Devoted wife or villainess? Watch this performance from Kate Mulvany and Ivan Donato of Bell Shakespeare to decide for yourself.

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'Hamlet': mischievous or mad?

The question of whether Hamlet is mad or just pretending to be has plagued critics and theatre-goers alike. In this excerpt from 'Hamlet', the audience is confronted with this very question. Watch Eryn-Jean Norvill and Tom Conroy from Bell Shakespeare as they present the encounter between Hamlet and Ophelia from Act 3, scene 1.

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'Romeo and Juliet': the language of true love

There are moments of extraordinary light and beauty amid the tragedy of 'Romeo and Juliet'. Join James Evans and actor Damien Strouthos from Bell Shakespeare as they discuss Act 2.2. Damien explains how Shakespeare's use of language reveals the intense passion, as well as frustration, experienced by Romeo and Juliet.

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'Julius Caesar': conspiracy and crime

In this early scene from Shakespeare's historical tragedy, Brutus and Cassius discuss Julius Caesar's right to rule. It acts as a prelude to the infamous conspiracy to assassinate Caesar. This performance by Hazem Shammas and Kate Mulvany of Bell Shakespeare reveals the persuasive power of language in Cassius' clever tongue ...

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Richard Flanagan - being a courageous writer

Whether we realise it or not, we are all storytellers. Every day we compose text messages, write emails or tell stories to friends and family. Yet when we are asked to write a story and share it with others, many of us find the process terrifying. This can sometimes be the case for published authors too. In this clip, discover ...

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Whingeing and the pursuit of happiness

Playwright David Williamson has probed aspects of Australia's social conscience since the 1960s. See him and actors Mark Lee and Anne Tenney discussing issues raised in the 2012 production of his play 'Happiness'.

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Joan London's 'Gilgamesh': exploring genre

How many times have you chosen a book based simply on its genre? Identifying the genre of a text can often be the key to whether we like it or not. In this clip, explore the ways genre has been manipulated in Joan London's novel 'Gilgamesh'. Jennifer Byrne's panellists from left to right are: China Mieville, Marieke Hardy, ...

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Writing from the fringe

Imagine a mysterious island with a wild, rugged landscape and a history of tragedy and hardship. But it is also an island of unrivalled beauty with a purity of nature rarely found today. Sound like something out of a novel? Well, it's Tasmania and it has inspired the writing of many novels, not the least of which are those ...

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Reading with Rebecca Lim

Watch this clip to find out what author Rebecca Lim liked to read when she was younger. How have these early interests influenced her writing as an adult? Do you get creative inspiration from books you read? What advice does Rebecca give to people who want to be writers?

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Navigating 'Cloud Atlas'

Some authors like to take readers on a journey, none more so than David Mitchell, the author of 'Cloud Atlas'. His novel is a complex tale that attempts to weave together six different narratives over a period of hundreds of years. Join in this discussion and find out if he succeeds. This clip is the second in a series of two.

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The lost and the missing at Hanging Rock

Joan Lindsay's 'Picnic at Hanging Rock' is often considered a classic of Australian literature. But what makes it so well-regarded? And does everyone agree? Join in this panel discussion and explore why one person's literary masterpiece is another's turgid pot-boiler.

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Teen titles dominate! The YA publishing industry

The Young Adult, or YA, publishing industry has exploded in recent years. But what is driving this surge in novels for teenagers? Join a panel of YA writers as they explore why this once niche market has become a literary phenomenon.

Audio

What makes Shakespeare so special anyway?

Few literary figures are as widely revered as William Shakespeare. But just how did this glove-maker's son grow to become the greatest writer of the English language? Explore the extraordinary appeal of Shakespeare with John Bell, Australia's pre-eminent Shakespearean actor and director. If you like this clip, listen to ...

Video

Kafka's 'The Metamorphosis': perfect fiction?

Franz Kafka's 'The Metamorphosis' is a classic of modernist literature. Explore why this novel continues to fascinate people 100 years after it was published. Jennifer Byrne leads the discussion with critics and writers Andy Griffiths, Toni Jordan, Marieke Hardy and Jason Steger.

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Anything's possible

What are writers of Young Adult (or YA) fiction seeking to achieve? What obligations do they have to their audience, if any? In this clip, listen as four successful authors share their ideas on these things.