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Humanities and social sciences / Year 4 / Knowledge and Understanding / Civics and citizenship

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

The differences between ‘rules’ and ‘laws’, why laws are important and how they affect the lives of people, including experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACHASSK092)

Elaborations
  • distinguishing between ‘laws’ (for example, speeding in school zones) and ‘rules’ (for example, sun safety in the school)
  • exploring the purpose of laws and recognising that laws apply to everyone in society
  • discussing examples of laws and why they are important to students’ lives
  • investigating the impact of laws on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (for example, environmental laws, native title laws and laws concerning sacred sites)
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding Ethical understanding
Cross-curriculum priorities
ScOT terms

Law,  Ethics

Text

Year 4: government and society

This collection of resource sheets for students and teachers introduce the differences between rules and laws and the basic operations of the Western Australian legal system. The resources also provide scaffolded research activities that focus on the culture of the Noongar people of Western Australia and the clash of cultures ...

Video

The Flip Side of Bike Helmets

It's illegal to ride a bike without a helmet in Australia. Sue Abbott and Dr Jake Olivier differ on this issue. This video is designed for students presents both points of view as a stimulus for students to reach their own conclusions. The video discusses how laws are made and explores different points of view on whether ...

Audio

Dogs that hop along on two legs?

Hear a passage from Captain James Cook's 'Endeavour' journal read aloud. This entry for 26 August 1770 includes a record of some of the animal species the British observed while they camped in the Endeavour River area. This audio clip is fifth in a series of six.

Video

Outback House - arrival of the hawker

Imagine leaving your home to travel back over 150 years ago, to live and work on an outback farm. Sixteen Australians take part in a reality TV show about life on Oxley Downs, a sheep station built to look and work like a real station of the 1860s. Discover the treats and treasures that a hawker brings to the station. Learn ...

Video

Impact of European settlement on Aboriginal Tasmanians

Aboriginal Tasmanians had inhabited Tasmania for over 40,000 years before the arrival of European settlers. What do you think life was like for Aboriginal Tasmanians before then? Why might have they embarked on a war, called the 'Black War', once settlers began arriving in Tasmania, despite existing relatively peacefully ...

Video

What makes your story?

Ngiyaampaa Elder Aunty Beryl Carmichael speaks in this clip about how important it is that Aboriginal people care for, or nurture, their spiritual self. She discusses the way things are connected and the importance of Dreaming stories. She also explains why she passes on knowledge and cultural heritage to younger members ...

Audio

Harvests and hazards in the seas

Hear a passage from Captain James Cook's 'Endeavour' journal read aloud. This entry includes observations of the sea life that the British crew observed around the Endeavour River where they camped for seven weeks. This is the final audio clip in a series of six.

Video

Confrontation on King Island

Governor King is commander of the British settlement in Port Jackson (now Sydney). He suspects French explorer Nicolas Baudin of planning to claim a French colony in 'New Holland'. King sends a ship to race Baudin to Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania). Watch this clip to find out what happens next.

Video

How plants work

Plants are the only living things that can make their own food. They do this during the day while it's light, using a process called photosynthesis, which uses carbon dioxide and produces oxygen. During the day and night plants take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide through respiration. Discover just how important plants ...

Video

Sydney's Aboriginal rock carvings in danger, 1969

How and why do things that are precious and important sometimes get damaged or destroyed? This clip from 1969 gives us some answers. It explores what was happening to significant Aboriginal rock carvings in and around Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park in New South Wales. We see many of the carvings, and hear a museum curator ...

Online

Liveability and sustainable living - teacher resource

This resource for teachers is a series of 12 activities in three parts that can be used to support the year 7 geography unit, Place and liveability. Each part includes several detailed activities relevant to exploring different aspects of liveability. These include: investigating local qualities of liveability, making comparisons ...

Image

Handwritten Chinese notice about gold fields mining legislation, 1873

This is a handwritten notice, the body of which is in Chinese characters, informing Chinese miners about the 'Gold Fields Regulations' and 'Gold Fields Act'. The notice is 15 columns wide with approximately 25 characters running down each column. Below the heading, in smaller script, is written 'By Order / of the Commissioner ...

Audio

Steven Heathcote recalls portraying Ned Kelly, 2005

This is an edited sound recording of leading Australian ballet dancer Steven Heathcote. He is recalling dancing the role of the bushranger Ned Kelly in the Australian Ballet's 1990 production of 'My name is Edward Kelly'. He outlines the mixed public perceptions of the character and the emotional challenges of the role. ...

Image

Ruins of the Model Prison, Port Arthur, 1911-15

This is a sepia-toned photograph measuring 8.2 cm x 13.2 cm. It shows the ruins of the Model Prison at Port Arthur, Tasmania. A semicircular brick wall has three barred doors that open to exercise yards. A fourth door is open, showing another brick wall with steps leading up to the closed door of a solitary confinement ...

Image

'Death of Ben Hall', painted in 1894

This is an oil painting, measuring 137.6 cm x 182.7 cm, by Patrick William Marony, depicting the death of the bushranger Ben Hall (1837-65) near Forbes, New South Wales. Hall sprawls in the foreground, his revolver on the ground in front of him and his rifle leaning against a tree. Behind him, across a broad clearing in ...

Image

'Attacking the mail, bushranging, NSW 1864'

This is a coloured print, measuring 19.8 cm x 25 cm, painted by the famous colonial artist Samuel Thomas Gill (1818-80) and published in 'The Australian Sketchbook'. It shows three masked bushrangers holding up the Royal Mail coach with shotguns and muskets. Their horses are hidden in nearby shrubs. The Mail is shown crowded ...

Image

'Underground cells, Point Puer', c1911-15

This is a sepia-toned black-and-white photograph (3.4 cm x 8.6 cm) showing the entrance to two cells of the former Point Puer Boys' Prison in Tasmania. The entrances are brick archways built into the side of a hill and are surrounded by bushland; there are numerous trees behind the brick structures. Text at the base of ...

Image

Electors arriving to vote, Mackay, 1877

This black-and-white pen-and-ink sketch depicts voters arriving at a polling station in a state by-election in Mackay, Queensland, on 23 April 1877. The voters arrive in horsedrawn buggies and carriages. Speech bubbles and banners include the slogans 'VOTE for LONG', 'Yah! no slavery!' and 'Beor! and down with Kanaka Labour!' ...

Audio

Judge Kevin Parker talks about 'beyond reasonable doubt', 2008

This is an edited sound recording of Kevin Parker, vice-president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), outlining the process of reaching a judgement. Parker stresses that a guilty verdict can only be based on a case being proven 'beyond reasonable doubt' through evidence brought before ...

Interactive

Biography: Federation people: Edwin Blackmore

Find out more about Edwin Blackmore, clerk to the Federal Convention 1897–98. Examine two different types of biographies of Blackmore: one short and the other more detailed. Inspect examples of how he was visually depicted in his time. This learning object is one in a series of objects in the 'Biography: Federation people' series.