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Civics and citizenship / Year 9 / Civics and Citizenship Skills / Questioning and research

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Develop, select and evaluate a range of questions to investigate Australia's political and legal systems (ACHCS082)

Elaborations
  • selecting key questions to investigate an aspect of Australia’s political and legal systems (for example, the role of juries)
  • posing questions which evaluate Australia’s democracy such as ‘how equal?’, ‘how representative?’ and ‘how accountable?’
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding Ethical understanding
ScOT terms

Law,  Politics

Online

Australian Civics and Citizenship Curriculum Year 9 unit of work

This unit of work explores key concepts relating to Australia's federal Parliament in particular the key question 'What influences shape the operation of Australia’s political system?' It contains lessons and a differentiated assessment item with a marking rubric.

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Cascades Female Factory

The Cascades Female Factory was both a prison and a factory for female convicts in early Hobart. It was a place where convict women were forced to undertake labour in slave-like conditions to support the fledgling colony. Learn what life at the Female Factory was like for the inmates. What sort of work did the women do? ...

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Ngapartji Ngapartji: powerful, explosive theatre

Theatre can tell powerful stories. In the 1950s, the early years of the Cold War, some Aboriginal people were removed from their land at Maralinga in South Australia to make way for British atomic testing. Ngapartji Ngapartji, a play combining traditional Aboriginal story-telling and contemporary theatrical styles, explores ...

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How computers track your internet history

A computer keeps track of your internet browsing by using "cookies". Find out some of the good and bad ways your internet history can be used, and learn about "cookie" stories and how they work?

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Impact of European settlement on Aboriginal Tasmanians

Aboriginal Tasmanians had inhabited Tasmania for over 40,000 years before the arrival of European settlers. What do you think life was like for Aboriginal Tasmanians before then? Why might have they embarked on a war, called the 'Black War', once settlers began arriving in Tasmania, despite existing relatively peacefully ...

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Tokugawa shogunate is overthrown

How did Japan's Tokugawa shogunate come to an end? The entry of the US fleet into Tokyo Bay in 1853 and the events that followed exposed the shogunate's policy of isolation as a potential threat to the country. Western influence, and Japan's response to it, would have an enormous impact on the country's future. This clip ...

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Examining Australia's Constitution

In this clip, reporter Stan Grant visits the National Archives of Australia to revisit the moment when Australia became a federation, on 1 January 1901. Stan examines the original Australian Constitution and reads out Section 127. What does it say? To try to understand why Indigenous people were so excluded, Stan considers ...

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Shoguns rule Japan with iron fists

Who were the shoguns and how did they rule Japan? In Japanese history, the time from about 1600 to 1868 is called the Edo period. In 1600, after centuries of wars, Japan came under the control of shoguns from the Tokugawa clan. They continued to rule until 1868, when they were overthrown. View this clip to discover how ...

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History of voting

Australia's first parliamentary election was in 1843. What was different about voting then? When and how did that change to resemble elections we have now? See if you can list the three significant dates in Australia’s history of voting and the changes that occurred on those dates.

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A new referendum

Today people are campaigning to hold a referendum that seeks to fully recognise Indigenous people in the Constitution. Why does Marcia Langton believe this is a crucial thing to do? What do you think? What makes Stan Grant Snr angry about the prospect of holding another referendum?

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Tragic consequences of Japan's modernisation

Japan went through a remarkable transformation between 1868 and the death of the Emperor Meiji in 1912. But Japan's modernisation was accompanied by its rise as an imperialist power, with tragic results. Watch this clip to learn about the consequences of Japan's dream of empire. This clip is last in a series of six.

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Caroline Chisholm's unwelcome companions

Caroline Chisholm's nerve was tested many times in Australia's harsh colonial society. Here, she first visits the building that, against all odds, she was determined to make into a much-needed home for immigrant women and girls. Watch the way she faces what she finds in this place that she had finally won from Governor ...

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Chisholm confronts Gipps

Meet courageous Caroline Chisholm as she tries to convince Governor Gipps to at least acknowledge the desperate situation of young women and girls who migrated to the British colony of New South Wales in the 1840s in the hope of a better life. This is the first in a series of three clips of re-enactments.

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What is constitutional recognition?

The constitution was written more than a century ago, but Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are not mentioned in it at all, despite having lived here for more than 50,000 years. What is constitutional recognition and why is it important? What are some of the perceived barriers to changing the constitution?

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The British arrive in Tasmania

Learn why, in 1803, the British established a colony in Tasmania, at Hobart Town. Find out about the hardships faced by the convicts and early colonists and the early industries that helped some of them prosper. Find out about the effect that displacement had on the local palawa people.

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Faith Bandler on voting yes in the 1967 referendum

In 1967, after 10 years of campaigning, Australia voted yes in the referendum on changing the way Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were referred to in the Constitution. Faith Bandler played an important role in campaigning for the yes vote. Do some research and find out more about this remarkable activist.

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History of Indigenous rights in Australia

You may have heard of the 1967 referendum that granted Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders some rights in Australia, but how did Indigenous rights evolve from there? Many, like the Black Power activists, believed the referendum didn't go far enough, especially in relation to land rights, and their causes gained prominence ...

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1967 and a new activism

How did the yes vote in 1967 change the way laws were made for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people? The struggle for land rights became the focus of the next wave of Aboriginal activists, who gained domestic and world attention by erecting a tent embassy on the lawns of  Parliament House in Canberra. Why was the ...

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Impact of British rule on India

Did the British government consider the economic and cultural interests of the Indian people to be as important as their own at the end of the 19th century? In this clip from a 1965 University of the Air program, Hugh Owen of the University of NSW discusses the impacts of British rule on India's economy and therefore on ...