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German / Year 5 and 6 / Understanding / Systems of language

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Explain and apply basic rules for German pronunciation, intonation, spelling and punctuation

[Key concepts: pronunciation, writing systems, punctuation; Key processes: spelling, making connections, applying rules]

 (ACLGEU148)

Elaborations
  • applying basic pronunciation rules, such as the two different pronunciations of ch
  • applying different intonation for statements, questions, exclamations and instructions
  • understanding that β can only be used in lower case, otherwise SS, and that ä, ö and ü can be written as ae, oe and ue respectively, for example, in upper case signs or word puzzles such as crosswords
  • applying phonic and grammatical knowledge to spell and write unfamiliar words containing, for example, ch, j, w and z, and diphthongs such as au, ei, eu and ie
  • noticing distinctive punctuation features of personal correspondence in German, such as Hallo Annette!/Lieber Klaus, followed respectively by upper or lower case for the beginning of the first sentence
  • understanding and applying punctuation rules (full stops, question marks, exclamation marks, commas, quotation marks) in German, including the meaning and use of full stops and commas in ordinal and decimal numbers (die 3. Klasse and 9,50 Euro), and capitalisation rules
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Spelling,  Punctuation,  Pronunciation,  Intonation,  German language

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