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Mathematics / Year 4 / Number and Algebra / Patterns and algebra

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Explore and describe number patterns resulting from performing multiplication (ACMNA081)

Elaborations
  • identifying examples of number patterns in everyday life
General capabilities
  • Numeracy Numeracy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Multiplication,  Number patterns

Video

What is a fractal?

Do you know what a fractal is? Basically, fractals are never-ending patterns created by repeated mathematical equations. In this clip, Yuliya, a student at MIT (in the USA) describes the properties of fractals and shows you where they can be found in technology and nature. Have a good look at the world around you and see ...

Video

Fun with fractals

Do you know how to recognise a fractal? Watch this video to find out! What are the examples given of fractals found in nature? Can you think of any others? Why not have a go at doing your own drawing of the Sierpinski Triangle?

Interactive

Sites2See: Patterns and Algebra

Selected links to a range of interactive online resources for the study of patterns and algebra in Foundation to Year 6 Mathematics.

Interactive

The array

Use an array-building tool to help solve multiplications. Explore strategies to break up multiplications. Create and solve easy multiplications such as 9x3. Examine relationships between rows, columns and areas in arrays.

Interactive

Musical number patterns: musical times

Make some music by building up rhythms from four instruments. Make a counting rule that matches a pattern on a number line. Select the start number and then select a number to count by. For example, describe a sound pattern where a saxophone waits on the first note, and then plays on every eighth note. Add a second number ...

Interactive

The array: go figure

This tutorial is suitable for use with a screen reader. It explains strategies for solving simple multiplications in your head such as 6x4. Work through sample questions and instructions explaining how to break up numbers into their factors. Solve multiplications by using arrays to break them up into rows and columns, then ...

Interactive

The multiplier: go figure

This tutorial is suitable for use with a screen reader. It explains strategies for solving complex multiplications in your head such as 22x38. Work through sample questions and instructions explaining how to use partitioning techniques. Solve multiplications by breaking them up into parts that are easy to work with, use ...

Video

Hour of Code: Bill Gates explains If statements

The Hour of Code is a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics. In this video, Bill Gates, creator of Microsoft introduces the If statement. He explains that the If statement is a fundamental concept in computer programming. By demonstrating the use ...

Video

Unplugged Activity: Graph Paper Programming

This video introduces one of code.org's unplugged activities and provides an introduction to programming without the use of computers. One student takes on the role of "programmer", drawing arrows and scribbles on paper to guide the other student to re-create a particular picture. For more information on the activities ...

Video

Unplugged Activity: What is computer science?

Do you know what a computer programmer does? Watch as some experts in the field explain. For more information on the activities introduced in this video, visit http://learn.code.org/s/1/level/1

Video

Hour of Code: Saloni teaches If/Else statements with Scrat the Squirrel from Ice Age

The Hour of Code is a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics. In this video, Saloni explains what an If/Else statement is. With the help of Scrat the Squirrel from Ice Age, she goes on to demonstrate how If/Else blocks can be used to program characters' ...

Video

Hour of Code: Saloni on the If/Else block

The Hour of Code is a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics. In this video, Saloni explains what an If/Else statement is and looks at how If/Else blocks can be used to program the movement of a zombie character. This is the fifth of seven clips in ...

Video

What are factors?

What are factors? Watch as the jelly babies in this clip show you! What are the factors of 12? How many factors does the number 11 have? Try explaining to a friend what a prime number is.

Video

Double that number

Explore an age-old multiplication method that repeatedly doubles numbers to get a product. Learn how this ancient method of multiplication is similar to that used by modern computers.

Online

Primary mathematics: games, simulations and modelling

These seven learning activities, which focus on 'games, simulations and modelling' using a variety of tools (software) and devices (hardware), illustrate the ways in which content, pedagogy and technology can be successfully and effectively integrated in order to promote learning. In the activities, teachers use games, ...

Online

Primary mathematics: open-ended tasks

These seven learning activities, which focus on 'open-ended tasks' using a variety of tools (software) and devices (hardware), illustrate the ways in which content, pedagogy and technology can be successfully and effectively integrated in order to promote learning. In the activities, teachers use investigations in order ...

Interactive

The difference bar: go figure

This tutorial is suitable for use with a screen reader. It explains how to split up numbers in your head when finding the difference between two numbers such as 26 and 73. Work through sample questions and instructions explaining how to use linear partitioning techniques. Find the difference between pairs of numbers. Split ...

Interactive

Circus towers: square stacks

Work out how many acrobats are needed to form square-shaped human towers. Start by building a square tower with four acrobats: two acrobats in the base layer and two acrobats standing on their shoulders. Examine a table and graph of the total number of acrobats in the towers. Predict the number of acrobats needed to build ...

Interactive

The divider: with or without remainders

Solve divisions such as 147/7 or 157/6 (some have remainders). Use a partitioning tool to help solve randomly generated divisions. Learn strategies to do complex arithmetic in your head. Split a division into parts that are easy to work with, use times tables, then solve the original calculation.

Interactive

Number trains

Arrange train carriages according to numbers on their sides. The numbers are represented in a range of formats such as words, numerals, dice dots or counting frames. Identify the numbers that come before and after starting numbers. Begin with numbers up to ten. Move on to work with larger numbers such as 40 and 50. Practise ...