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Health and physical education / Year 7 and 8 / Movement and Physical Activity / Understanding movement

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Demonstrate and explain how the elements of effort, space, time, objects and people can enhance movement sequences (ACPMP084)

Elaborations
  • performing a range of movements and analysing technique based on understanding of take-off, body position and landing
  • demonstrating an understanding of how to adjust the angle of release of an object and how this will affect the height and distance of flight
  • creating, performing and appraising movement sequences that demonstrate variations in flow and levels
  • designing and refining movement concepts and strategies to manipulate space and their relationship to other players in this space
  • explaining how individual or team performance has improved through modifications to effort, space and time
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Sports,  Shape (Dance),  Spatial levels (Dance),  Human movement,  Movement pathways

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