Health and physical education / Year 9 and 10 / Movement and Physical Activity / Understanding movement

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Examine the role physical activity, outdoor recreation and sport play in the lives of Australians and investigate how this has changed over time (ACPMP104)

Elaborations
  • participating in a range of physical activities from the Asia region, such as yoga, tai chi, martial arts and Asia-inspired dance and performance art, and exploring their importance as a social and cultural practice
  • researching the trends in participation in organised junior sports and predicting future trends and directions
  • investigating the varied perspectives held by Australians on sport and examining how this diversity is represented in the sports we play today
  • exploring the impact of media messages associated with physical activity, outdoor recreation and sport in Australia
  • analysing the significant contributions Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people make, and have made, to sport in Australia
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Sporting culture,  Recreation,  Physical activity

Online

Tackling disability discrimination in sport

This is a unit of work about disability discrimination in sport. It explores: the concept of disability rights and how to make sports more inclusive; the barriers people with disabilities face when participating in some sports; the role of the Australian Human Rights Commission in disability complaints in sport; participation ...

Image

Harbour swimming, Manly, 1960

This is a colour photograph depicting young children diving off a special apparatus at Manly Beach. The photograph was taken by Bill Brindle, who worked for the Australian News and Information Bureau. It is part of an online showcase called 'Summers Past'. Information about this particular item can be located in its educational ...

Online

Yulunga: inkanyi

Although not a universal activity, athletic events were common. In a part of central Australia the children would have running races together. The race was a cooperative effort. According to age, running speed and fitness levels, runners started at different distances and all players attempted to finish together. This activity ...

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Yulunga: tarnambai

Although not a universal activity, athletics-type events were common. On Tiwi (Bathurst) Island the children collected the seed heads of the ‘spring rolling grass’ (Spinifex hirsutis) that grew on the sand hills near the coast. These were taken to the beach and released. The children allowed these to be blown along by the ...

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Yulunga: mer kolap

This object-throwing game was observed being played in the Torres Strait on Mer Island in the nineteenth century. More recent versions have been observed. This version of an object-throwing game is a relay event. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding ...

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Yulunga: gugiyn nahri

The activities outlined are examples of how the games can be modified to be used in a tabloid event. Groups of four to six players over a two to three-minute time period are recommended. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation ...

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Yulunga: pulyugge

Keep-away types of ball games were played in many parts of Australia. Pulyugge was played between selected teams of different groups in the Murray, Lake Alexandria and Lake Albert areas of South Australia. A running, passing and ball-catching game of team keep-away. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was ...

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Yulunga: kungirruna

Various types of running and stepping games were played in many parts of Australia. This is a running and stepping activity in which players step on (or over) markers. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture ...

Online

Yulunga: emu

This game is based on a chasing game observed being played by Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory in more recent times. This is a chasing and catching (tag) game. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous ...

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Yulunga: kaidu babu

This is a popular water game that was observed being played at Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait region, by Margaret Lawrie in the 1960s. This is an underwater swimming game. The object of the game is to see who can swim the longest distance underwater. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed ...

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Yulunga: ngarinbarm

The swimming game of ngarinbarm (turtle) was played by the Jagara (Jagera) people in lagoons around the Brisbane area. Players in a canoe chase and attempt to catch a ngarinbarm. The players who are the turtles swim underwater to avoid capture. The players in the canoe may enter the water to touch the turtles if they are ...

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Yulunga: epoo korio

Epoo korio was a wrestling game of the Kiwai people of Papua and some people in the northern parts of the Torres Strait Island region. This is a team game in which attackers attempt to knock over a mound of sand and defenders try to stop them. The level of physical contact is controlled. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...

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Yulunga: ilye

A boomerang game was played by the Wogadj people of central Australia. This was a keep-away type of game that encouraged a lot of running. A boomerang was thrown along the ground in the game. The older men usually played against the younger men. The game is one of running and throwing using a disc (frisbee) in place of ...

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Yulunga: purlja

This was a popular and enjoyable ball game of the Walbiri people of central Australia and was usually played in spring. A purlja (ball) was made of hair-string with the inside containing crumbled pith — the stems and leaves of small soft plants and shrubs. The game was played by males who had reached puberty. Two teams ...

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Yulunga: bari barlam bembinge

This is a suggested outline of a traditional games event. The games and activities outlined have been modified for use with co-educational classes and groups of different age and/or abilities, as a workshop or traditional games activity over a time period of one hour to one and a half hours. Groups of six to 12 may be used. ...

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Yulunga: wana wana

This is a version of a game played by the young Noongar girls in the southwest of Western Australia. A girl used her wana (digging stick) to stop the other girls hitting a short stick placed on the ground. Players practise their throwing, catching and hitting skills. (This is a practice activity version of the game called ...

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Yulunga: puloga

Regular mock combat tournaments took place in the Cardwell and Tully River areas of north Queensland. The Mallanpara people called this a prun. It was essentially an entertainment activity, though the opportunity was taken to settle disputes, real or imaginary. It also gave the men a chance to show off their prowess and ...

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Yulunga: woomera

A woomera or throwing stick was used by Aboriginal boys and men in all parts of Australia to propel spears with great force, often over considerable distances. On Dunk Island in Queensland a favourite target for spear-throwing contests was the white ant nests hanging from the gum trees. This is a throwing competition for ...

Online

Yulunga: marutchi

Marutchi or black swan was a water game played by the Jagara (or Jagera) people in the Brisbane area. It was often played among inhabitants from different areas. Some of the players were very clever and could avoid being caught. If a player became tired he or she could be replaced by another player. Spectators were not ...

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Yulunga: kal boming

The Kal boming (fire-hitting) game was played by the Noongar people in the southern districts of Western Australia and called for both agility and strength. A fire was lit either on the ground or the top of a Balga or Xanthorrhoea (‘grass tree’). The players divided themselves into two teams. One side tried to put the fire ...