Health and physical education / Foundation / Personal, Social and Community Health / Contributing to healthy and active communities

Curriculum content descriptions

Participate in play that promotes engagement with outdoor settings and the natural environment (ACPPS007)

Elaborations
  • exploring a range of ways to play and be active in outdoor or natural settings
  • understanding how to be safe in the outdoors through play in natural environments
  • playing traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander games such as Kolap using natural materials
General capabilities
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Outdoor education,  Adventure games

Interactive

‘Physical Education – Essential skills for primary teachers’ online course

The aim of this online refresher course is to enhance the confidence and competence of generalist primary school teachers in delivering purposeful and engaging PE. The course aims to improve student learning in schools by addressing critical challenges. It tackles the decline in physical education and the rise of sedentary ...

Online

Playing for life activity cards (F-2)

The cards include a variety of games designed to develop the skills of a range of sports and to encourage children to have fun and get active by focusing on skills not drills. The activities are based on the Game Sense approach, with the objective to develop in school-aged children a love of physical activity that will ...

Online

Narragunnawali: Reconciliation in Schools and Early Learning

The Narragunnawali website is a portal of rich content and professional resources for teachers and students in schools and early learning centres that promotes reconcilation between the wider Australian community and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The website includes curriculum- aligned resources and professional ...

Online

Yulunga: giriga

A duck ‘catching’ game was played by little boys and girls at Cape Bedford, Cooktown and the McIvor regions in north Queensland. This game was recorded by Walter Roth in the early 1900s. This is a role-play, running-and-chasing tag game suitable for younger children. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was ...

Online

Yulunga: yulunga

Yulunga means ‘playing’ in the language of the Kamilaroi (Gamori) people from the northwest of New South Wales. The following games and activities may be organised as part of a display of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander games. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians ...

Online

Yulunga: wirrwuyu

As in various other cultures, stone skipping (throwing) along a surface of water was played by Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. On Dunk Island in Queensland, the throwing of cuttle-fish (krooghar) bones was observed. The bones were thrown along the surface of the water like ‘skipping stones’ and ...

Online

Yulunga: segur etug

This is a guessing game that originates from Mer Island in the Torres Strait region. It is a number-guessing game. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture by celebrating the games that Indigenous Australians ...

Online

Yulunga: Gitja

The Gitga (moon) play game from the north Queensland area was usually played when a number of children gathered together. The full version of the game observed involved imitation and acting aspects along with a running-and-chasing activity. This is a chasing-and-catching (tag) game. It is a simplified version of a more ...

Online

Yulunga: mer kolap

This object-throwing game was observed being played in the Torres Strait on Mer Island in the nineteenth century. More recent versions have been observed. This version of an object-throwing game is a relay event. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding ...

Online

Yulunga: gugiyn nahri

The activities outlined are examples of how the games can be modified to be used in a tabloid event. Groups of four to six players over a two to three-minute time period are recommended. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation ...

Online

Yulunga: wabbyn

The Injibandi people of Western Australia had many guessing games. Wabbagunja kambong, wabbyn, ngabbungee jenarnung, kambugenjin were some of the names of their guessing games. Guessing games were often played around the campfire after the day’s hunting was over. Women might also play these guessing games among themselves ...

Online

Yulunga: inkanyi

Although not a universal activity, athletic events were common. In a part of central Australia the children would have running races together. The race was a cooperative effort. According to age, running speed and fitness levels, runners started at different distances and all players attempted to finish together. This activity ...

Online

Yulunga: tabud nuri

A game of tag observed being played on Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait by Margaret Lawrie. It is a group activity that is suitable for younger players. Players in a line coil and uncoil like a snake before a player is chased by other players, who attempt to touch (catch) him or her. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...

Online

Yulunga: koabangan

A game called koabangan was a finding-object game observed being played in the early 1900s by the Kokominni boys of north Queensland. The object commonly used was a goanna claw, but other objects were also used. A player hides an object in a designated area and the other players attempt to find it. The Yulunga: Traditional ...

Online

Yulunga: thirring-nunna

This hide-and-seek game was described as being played by the Aboriginal children in an unidentified part of Queensland. It was called thirring-nunna (Where are we?). It is a hide-and-seek game where all players hide from a player who looks for them. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide ...

Online

Yulunga: turi turi

In the northwest-central area of Queensland, the Maidhargari children made a type of skippingrope (turi turi) from the long roots of the Bauhinia (Queensland bean tree), or white-gum, which grew near the water’s edge. A vine rope was used in the same way by Wogadj children on the Daly River in the Northern Territory. This ...

Online

Yulunga: wana

The young Noongar girls in the southwest of Western Australia played many skill games. In one of these a short stick was placed on the ground and girls attempted to hit the stick while one girl defended it using her wana (digging stick). Players use an underarm throw to hit a target, which is defended by the player with ...

Online

Yulunga: riawena

Riawena means ‘fun (sport)’ in the language used by the Aboriginal people of the Oyster Bay area of Tasmania. A number of the games and activities can be conducted as athletic events. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation ...

Online

Yulunga: moka bandi

This guessing game was observed being played by young and old at Cape Bedford in north Queensland. It is a guessing game similar to ‘I spy’. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture by celebrating the games ...

Online

Yulunga: kangaroo

Imitation activities were a favourite and popular activity for children everywhere. In one activity children would copy the actions of the kangaroo. This is a jumping relay race based on the actions of a kangaroo jumping. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a ...