Search results

Listed under:  Society  >  Culture  >  Regional culture  >  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples  >  Aboriginal peoples
Video

Adventure at Thompson's Creek - Ngayu Jilba Dungan Bada Thompson's Creek

This animation of a contemporary story created by primary school children from the Wajal Wajal community in Far North Queensland. The story is told in two versions; one in English language and one in Kuku Yalanji language. A glossary of language in provided along with a transcript of the story.

Interactive

The importance of protecting local Indigenous heritage

Students research the history of The Hills Shire Darug tribe in the importance of Indigenous sites in the area and Indigenous names associated with the North West region of Sydney. Students gain an understanding of local Indigenous groups’ connection to North West region communities through individual Indigenous inspired ...

Interactive

Different views

This resource will encourage students to develop their understanding of the first contact of the Aboriginal people of Kamay Botany Bay and the men aboard the HMB Endeavour in 1770. This resource is one part of the 'Endeavour – eight days in Kamay' resource.

Interactive

Waters of Kamay

This learning sequence explores the salt and fresh waters of Kamay Botany Bay, its importance as a life source and the cultural connection it has to the Aboriginal people living at Kamay. Water is essential for life. It nourishes our bodies, our lands and supports all life on earth. It is home to wondrous and significant ...

Interactive

Exploring Kamay

This resource explores the landscape of Kamay Botany Bay, as well as the technology discovered by the crew aboard the HMB Endeavour in 1770. This resource is one part of the 'Endeavour – eight days in Kamay' resource.

Interactive

Endeavour to persuade

This resource is designed to guide Year 3 to Year 6 students in the art of persuasive writing, based on responses to information texts and their own research on specific topics. The information texts used in this resource were written as part of the commemoration of the visit of HMB Endeavour to Kamay Botany Bay in 1770. ...

Interactive

Who lived here first and how do we know?

In this lesson students explore the importance of country and place to Aboriginal people, with a focus on the Darug proper of the North West Sydney region. Students examine a range of evidence about the Darug to help answer the questions ‘Who lived here first?’ and ‘How do we know?’.

Interactive

Perspectives on Kamay

This resource explores the perspectives of the Aboriginal people of Kamay Botany Bay and the men aboard the HMB Endeavour upon their meeting in 1770. It will also help students to understand the history of Australia's Aboriginal peoples and why their stories of the past are equally important to hear. Note to Aboriginal ...

Video

Making a difference in the Daintree

Thousands of visitors flock to Queensland's Daintree rainforest region each year. See how a new ecotourism venture is not only improving the tourist experience, but also benefits the local Aboriginal community.

Video

Birian Balunah: the birthing of the rivers

Paula Nihot shares a story told to her by Yugambeh Elder Patricia O’Connor. It's the story of Wanungara, queen of the mountains, and her daughters Princess Toolona and Princess Caningera, and how their complicated relationships and choices explain the geography of the region.

Video

Ngurdungurdu: The Tiger Shark

The Tiger Shark travels from the east to his country at the mouth of the Wearyan River on the Gulf coast of the Northern Territory. On his way he encounters the Rock Wallaby, who drives him from her country. The Rrumburriya clan of the Yanyuma people are the custodians of the Tiger Shark Dreaming. This story from the Yanyuwa ...

Video

li-Maramaranja: Dugong Hunters

The story of the Dugong Hunters, or li-Maramaranja, belongs to the Rrumburriya clan of the Yanyuwa people, who live along the Gulf coast of the Northern Territory. In this story, the dugong hunter Jurruji encounters trouble when he falls into a crevasse on an island in the Gulf of Carpentaria. This story from the Yanyuwa ...

Audio

Indigenous perspective on sustainability

Find out about some Indigenous sustainability practices and perspectives on land management in this audio interview with a spokesperson from the 2007 Caring for Country conference. Listen as he explains how traditional knowledge of the land and cultural significance guide Aboriginal environmental sustainability. Also discover ...

Video

How life can change

Explore the remarkable journey of Akram Azimi, the 2013 Young Australian of the Year, from Kabul in war-ravaged Afghanistan to Perth, WA, then to Looma, a remote Aboriginal community in the Kimberley. Learn how Akram developed a passion to help 'Australians have a deeper sense of connection to this land'. This short clip ...

Image

1860s Colonial life

No TV. No electricity. No running water. No car. Imagine living on sheep stations in New South Wales in the 1860s.

Video

Manankurra Kujika: the song of the Tiger Shark

The Rrumburriya clan of the Yanyuma people are the custodians of the Tiger Shark Dreaming. In this animation, the Tiger Shark sings plants, fish, birds, fresh water and people at Manankurra, at the mouth of the Wearyan River on the Gulf coast of the Northern Territory. This story from the Yanyuwa people is one of nine that ...

Video

Legacy of Nazism in modern Vienna

Why did Nazis in Austria dig up hundreds of human remains from graves in Vienna's Währing Jewish cemetery? Join reporter Mark Corcoran as he visits a Viennese museum to search for the remains of an 18th-century Jewish baroness. He makes some disturbing discoveries there. This clip from 2007 is the second of two.

Video

Burringurrah: the boy who ran from initiation

Charlie Snowball tells the story of Burringurrah, a landform named after a boy who ran away from tribal initiation. Also known as Mount Augustus, Burringurrah in Western Australia is often claimed to be the world’s largest rock. What other significant rock features is Australia known for?

Video

Purdiwan: Pretty One

The Garrwa people live inland from the Gulf of Carpentaria, on either side of the border between the Northern Territory and Queensland. In this brief but beautiful animation, a Garrwa woman herds her pretty goats eastward.

Video

Harvesting and cooking murnong

Murnong is an edible Australian native plant that was prolific in south-eastern Australia. Which part of the murnong is eaten? Why was it so abundant in certain parts of Victoria? Watch Aunty Julie to learn how murnong is harvested and cooked.