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Listed under:  Society  >  Citizenship  >  Law  >  Crime  >  Criminals
Moving Image

Ned Kelly confronts his judge

How do the lives of Ned Kelly and Redmond Barry reflect the contrasting experiences of those who came to Australia as convicts and free settlers? Kelly was the son of an Irish convict and claimed to be fighting against the injustices of the old world revisited in the new. Barry had arrived in Melbourne as a free Irish immigrant. ...

Video

Rogue nation, 2009: NSW in 1819, convict gulag or place of opportunity?

This clip is an excerpt from the 2009 documentary 'Rites of passage', the second of a two-part series entitled 'Rogue nation'. The clip begins with historian Michael Cathcart providing contextual information about England in the early 1800s. He says that in the midst of the industrial revolution, millions of people were ...

Video

Two convicts steal a place in history, 2009

'Two convicts steal a place in history' is a video excerpt from the documentary 'Rites of Passage' - the second episode of the two-part series entitled 'Rogue Nation' produced in 2009. In this clip, two soldiers in colonial NSW steal a piece of cloth with the intention of getting caught. In 'Rogue Nation' historian Michael ...

Video

William Wentworth: 'currency lad', 2009

This video clip focuses on William Wentworth, the colonial-born son of a convict, destined to become a loud charismatic press baron, publicist, barrister and patriot. 'William Wentworth: "currency lad"' is an excerpt from the documentary 'Rites of Passage' - the second episode of the two-part series entitled 'Rogue Nation' ...

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Portrait of bushranger Martin Cash, c1860

This is a black-and-white portrait photograph of Martin Cash (c1808-77), a notorious Tasmanian bushranger who arrived in Australia as a convict in 1828. This formal portrait photograph, taken by J W Beattie (1859-1930), shows Cash as an older man, sitting dressed in a white shirt, waistcoat and jacket. It may have been ...

StillImage

Leather convict caps, 1820-65

These are folding leather convict caps made in Britain and worn in Australia between 1820 and 1865. They feature high creased crowns and semicircular folding sides, which could be tied up above the crown or let down to form a brim. All are hand sewn and have leather lining and a leather-bound brim.

StillImage

Woollen convict cap, 1820-55

This is a man's grey woollen convict cap with high creased crown and curved sides. 'BO' (Board of Ordnance) is stamped in ochre-coloured paint on the lower rim. It was manufactured either in Australia or Britain sometime between 1820 and 1855.

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Convict jacket, 1855-80

This is a convict jacket of black and yellow felted wool, manufactured in England and worn in Australia sometime between 1855 and 1880. The jacket is short with front buttoning, a high stand-up collar, and a long, shaped sleeve with buttoned cuff. Of the original six metal painted black buttons, three are missing. The torso, ...

StillImage

'Race to the gold diggings of Australia' board game, 1850-69

This is a 'Race to the gold diggings of Australia' board game made in England between 1850 and 1869. The game board is a hand-coloured lithograph mounted on linen. There is a printed rule card, six painted ship pieces with stands and a cardboard teetotum, all of which would have been stored in a wooden case with an illustrated ...

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Bushranger medal, 1849-50

This hand-engraved, 'Long Service and Good Conduct' silver medal was awarded to Sergeant Thomas Quigley for apprehending bushrangers in NSW. On the obverse is a coat of arms consisting of a shield with motifs, a rising sun, a kangaroo and an emu. 'ADVANCE AUSTRALIA' is engraved on the scroll below. The text 'NEW SOUTH WALES' ...

Audio

Convict life in The Rocks, Sydney

Discover in this audio file what life was like for the convicts who first arrived in Sydney. Associate Professor Grace Karskens explains that, contrary to popular opinion, most convicts were not confined to gaol or work gangs. Many convicts settled in the Rocks area in their own houses and were able to conduct a normal ...

Audio

A view of Australia's identity and immigration

How have the convict era and immigration influenced Australia's view of itself? In this clip from an audio interview, journalist Geraldine Doogue interviews historian John Hirst. They discuss his views about convict heritage, national character, the White Australia policy, racism, and recent immigration, refugee and and ...

Audio

William Cuffay's early campaigns in Hobart

Why is William Cuffay described as being 'right at the forefront of early Australian unionism'? This extract from a radio program 'The Isle of Denial: William Cuffay in Van Diemen's Land' describes Cuffay's experiences in Tasmania as a convict on a Ticket of Leave and a civil rights campaigner. Listen to the ways Cuffay ...

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Survivors of the sinking of HMAS Perth, 1942

Discover what happened to the sailors aboard the Royal Australian Navy's light cruiser HMAS Perth when it was torpedoed during a battle in the Sunda Strait on 28 February 1942 and sank shortly after midnight on 1 March. This program was broadcast on Anzac Day 2013. Watch and listen as three Perth survivors recall their ...

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First edition of the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, 1803

This is a first edition of the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, published on 5 March 1803 by the Government Printer, Sydney. It is a black-and-white printed, folded newspaper. It contains general orders from the governor, notice of sales and advertising, news of ship movements, reports of a fire and notice ...

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Blood, sweat and stones: convict builders

Visit a working farm in Tasmania that uses buildings made by convict workers in the early 1800s. See the stones they carried and the tools they used. Find out how farm work has changed since colonial times. This clip is one in a series of four.

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My Place - Episode 18: 1838: Davey, The bushranger

While out walking Duchess, Davey and Alice witness a bushranger on the run from some local soldiers and they misdirect the soldiers to ensure his swift escape. Davey is confronted by the Owen boys who tease him about the imminent fate of Duchess.

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My Place - Episode 20: 1818: Charles, Being a lady

Charles's mother educates him on the difference between Sarah and 'a lady'. Charles steals some of his mother's clothes in order to create a disguise for Liam but is surprised when Liam uses the disguise to gatecrash Sarah's wedding.

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Archeologists hunt for Ned Kelly clues

What can the site of the Kelly gang's last stand tell us about Ned's final battle with the police? This clip provides a brief overview of the Kelly story using scenes from the 1906 film 'The Story of the Kelly Gang'. Watch as archeologists dig up the battle site at Glenrowan. See what they find and how these things might ...

Audio

William Cuffay: 'Fellow slaves'

How did William Cuffay's link with slavery help him become such an influential campaigner for civil rights? This extract from a radio program 'The Isle of Denial: William Cuffay in Van Diemen's Land' explores similarities between convict transportation and slavery and the conditions of the British working class.