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Listed under:  Games
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Primary mathematics: games, simulations and modelling

These seven learning activities, which focus on 'games, simulations and modelling' using a variety of tools (software) and devices (hardware), illustrate the ways in which content, pedagogy and technology can be successfully and effectively integrated in order to promote learning. In the activities, teachers use games, ...

Online

Yulunga: yulunga

Yulunga means ‘playing’ in the language of the Kamilaroi (Gamori) people from the northwest of New South Wales. The following games and activities may be organised as part of a display of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander games. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians ...

Online

Yulunga: kangaroo

Imitation activities were a favourite and popular activity for children everywhere. In one activity children would copy the actions of the kangaroo. This is a jumping relay race based on the actions of a kangaroo jumping. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a ...

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Zoological garden paper theatre, 1860-70

This is a toy paper theatre with a zoological-garden theme. It was probably made in Germany during the decade 1860-70. The set includes 46 separate cardboard cut-outs (some shown) depicting various parts of a zoological garden. Each has been printed lithographically in monochrome and then handpainted using aniline dyes. ...

Online

Yulunga: segur etug

This is a guessing game that originates from Mer Island in the Torres Strait region. It is a number-guessing game. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture by celebrating the games that Indigenous Australians ...

Interactive

2024 Dreaming

Explore options for houses, work, food and transport in 2024 in this multimedia presentation from Radio National. A useful resource for stimulating discussion about applications of science and implications for society and the environment as well as current issues and developments in science. Gives examples of how different ...

Online

Yulunga: wabbyn

The Injibandi people of Western Australia had many guessing games. Wabbagunja kambong, wabbyn, ngabbungee jenarnung, kambugenjin were some of the names of their guessing games. Guessing games were often played around the campfire after the day’s hunting was over. Women might also play these guessing games among themselves ...

Online

Yulunga: yangamini

The game of ‘holey’ or yangamini is an object-throwing game played by the Tiwi people of Bathurst Island. Other versions of the game are found elsewhere in Australia among Aboriginal people. For example, the children at Maningrida, Arnhem Land, threw small Anadara bivalve shells into a hollow in the sand and applauded the ...

Online

Yulunga: nandrra-rna

A small number of ‘marble’ type games (either traditional or introduced) were played in various parts of Australia. Gugada boys, living near Tarcoola in South Australia, used wooden marbles. The marbles placed in the ring were called kooka (meat) and the shooting marble was called kodji (spear). In the 1940s on Mer Island, ...

Online

Yulunga: moka bandi

This guessing game was observed being played by young and old at Cape Bedford in north Queensland. It is a guessing game similar to ‘I spy’. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture by celebrating the games ...

Online

Yulunga: noongar wana

The young Noongar girls in the southwest of Western Australia played many skill games. In one of these a short stick was placed on the ground and the other girls attempted to hit the stick while the girl defended it using her wana (digging stick). Different versions of this game have been recorded by observers. Players ...

Online

Yulunga: kalq

This was a spear game observed being played by some Aboriginal groups on Cape York Peninsula in north Queensland. The men used a throwing stick (woomera) to project a big killing spear (kalq) towards the next player. The spear would travel around the circle of men, who were armed only with their woomera, which they then ...

Online

Yulunga: wana

The young Noongar girls in the southwest of Western Australia played many skill games. In one of these a short stick was placed on the ground and girls attempted to hit the stick while one girl defended it using her wana (digging stick). Players use an underarm throw to hit a target, which is defended by the player with ...

Online

Yulunga: arrkene irreme

The boys of the Aranda and Luridja of central Australia played a hitting game. A small cylindrical stick, sharpened at each end, was laid on the ground. A longer stick was held in one hand. The player hit one end of the stick to make it bounce into the air and as it rose it was hit with considerable force. A hitting and ...

Online

Yulunga: pukamitjal

A popular ball game of keep-away was played by adults in camps on Mornington Island in northern Australia. Grass and/or leaves were rolled into a ball and bound with hair-string or a piece of fishing net. The adults formed two teams and energetically threw the ball to each other until they tired. This is a keep-away throwing ...

Online

Yulunga: pulyugge

Keep-away types of ball games were played in many parts of Australia. Pulyugge was played between selected teams of different groups in the Murray, Lake Alexandria and Lake Albert areas of South Australia. A running, passing and ball-catching game of team keep-away. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was ...

Online

Yulunga: puldjungi

In one area of Victoria the ball game of puldjungi was played. Two sides (nangkera) were chosen and a ball was kicked up between them by a non-player. When it was caught by a player of one side they attempted to throw it to one of their own team. The ball was thrown from the shoulder and caught with one hand — if both hands ...

Online

Yulunga: mer kai

This is a version of a game from the Torres Strait Islands, using the thick, oval, deep-red fruit of the kai tree, which is quite light when dry. This is a hand-hitting (volley) game where players attempt to keep the ball in the air for as long as they can. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed ...

Online

Yulunga: puth

A number of games were and still are played on former mission sites and settlements in the central parts of Australia, to fill in time. These include introduced card-playing games, including local variations such as kuns, tossing objects and other line and object games. During the heat of the day many people spent their ...

Online

Yulunga: chuboochuboo

A chuboochuboo is a wallaby skin stuffed with grass and about the size of a football. Men, women and children played the game. The game generated a great deal of fun and enjoyment and never any arguments. It was observed being played in parts of South Australia. The Aboriginal people of the Lower Murray and surrounding ...