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Listed under:  Science  >  Forces and energy  >  Fundamental forces  >  Gravity
Interactive resource

Gravity

Learn how to calculate the orbits of planets and satellites. Follow Newton's reasoning in deriving his universal gravitation law. Use the conservation of mechanical energy to find the escape velocity for a rocket. Extend these ideas to find the sizes of black holes. This resource consists of a video in eight sections with ...

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Surviving a bed of nails

Watch the Surfing Scientist, Reuben Meerman, and Dr Karl persuade Adam Spencer to lie on a bed of nails and then use science and maths to explain what happens. Check out what happens next when they smash a concrete block on his stomach while he's lying on the bed of nails.

Interactive resource

Projectiles

Learn to analyse the motion of an object that is projected into the air. Look at the vertical and horizontal components of the motion. Discover how the range of a projectile depends on the angle of projection. This resource consists of a video in five sections with a supporting web page containing background material.

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Why do astronauts float in space?

Have you wondered what it would be like to be an astronaut floating around in the International Space Station? In this clip, Catalyst's Dr Derek Muller investigates what causes this weightlessness in space. Derek challenges some people visiting the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney to explain why they think astronauts float. ...

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Meteorites, asteroids, orbiting and gravity

Learn how Galileo Galilei's work overturned Aristotle's ideas about falling objects and led to an understanding that Earth revolves around the sun. Find out how Isaac Newton showed that the laws of motion on Earth and in space are the same, and that he discovered that the gravitational force of attraction between any two ...

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Applying trigonometry: leaning tower

The Leaning Tower of Gingin is the centrepiece of the Gravity Discovery Centre. The Catalyst team of Derek, Simon and Anja drop watermelons from the tower, to examine the rate at which they fall. They are testing Galileo's theory about falling objects. The dimensions of the tower provide an opportunity to apply some basic ...

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Do heavier things fall faster?

Will a medicine ball or a basketball hit the ground first when dropped at the same time from the same height? In this clip, Catalyst's Dr Derek Muller investigates what influences the speed at which objects fall. Derek challenges some people in a market to make a prediction and explain their thinking, before he finally ...

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Effects of g-force on the human body

Peter Rowsthorn visits the Australian International Air Show to answer the question, 'What effect does g-force have on the human body?' Join Pete in the cockpit of a light plane for some aerobatics with pilot David Pilkington. G-force expert Dr David Newman explains the science as Pete endures up to 6 g in the aircraft.

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Do different things fall faster?

Want to find out what happens when you drop a watermelon and an apple from the top of a building? In this clip, Bernie Hobbs and Ruben Meerman, investigate whether the mass of an object influences how fast it falls. Bernie and Ruben ride the 'Giant Drop' at Dreamworld, drop a watermelon and apple from an eighth floor balcony, ...

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Balancing an aluminium can: centre of gravity

Be astounded as you watch Ruben the Surfing Scientist make an aluminium soft drink can balance at 45 degrees and rotate in a circle, as if by magic. Learn about the science behind this trick.

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Meet the BFFs: four fundamental forces

We all know something about gravity, but what about the other fundamental forces of physics? Explore the properties of two familiar forces experienced in daily life, and of two less familiar ones. How do they interact, and what keeps everything from falling apart? This video was Kate Dent's entry into the 2013 Sleek Geeks ...

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Friction: friend or foe?

What part does the force of friction play in our everyday lives? Friction can be an advantage (friend) or a problem (foe). Join interviewer Doug Traction and professors Static, Slide, Rolling and Fluid at the National Tribology Research Centre as they have forceful fun investigating friction. This video won a prize in the ...

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Ramping it up, Egyptian pyramid style

How did the ancient Egyptians move and lift huge stones during construction of the pyramids? Secondary student Angus Atkinson designed an experiment to find out how the lives of pyramid workers could have been made easier. See how as you watch this video, which he entered in the 2013 Sleek Geeks Eureka Science Schools Prize.

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The physics of a slinky drop

Imagine holding a slinky by the top end, with the bottom end dangling in mid-air. What do you think would happen when you let it go? Explore the physics of two equal and opposing forces working on an object in this awesome experiment!

Teacher resource

Secondary science: models and simulations

These seven learning activities, which focus on 'models and simulations' using a variety of tools (software) and devices (hardware), illustrate the ways in which content, pedagogy and technology can be successfully and effectively integrated in order to promote learning. In the activities, teachers assist students to interpret, ...

Teacher resource

Backyard Science: forces

This resource, including student videos, provide opportunities for students to identify types of forces, determine whether forces are balanced or unbalanced and compare water and air resistance. They will conduct an investigation into the relationship between friction and different types of surfaces. Students will design, ...

Interactive resource

Electromagnetism: electromagnet basics

Explore the parts of an electromagnet circuit. Test objects made of different materials to find out whether they are affected by magnetic fields. For example, discover whether a rubber band is deflected by the field of an electromagnet. This learning object is one of three learning objects in the same series.

Interactive resource

Jet force: training

Shoot a disc at a target to score goals. Control the direction of the disc by applying linear forces. Use a single linear force or combine up to three forces. Train for a match by aiming accurately. This activity is one in a series of three activities.

Interactive resource

Jet force: match

Shoot a disc at a target to score goals. Control the direction of the disc by applying linear forces. Use a single linear force or combine multiple forces. Play a match where you score points by aiming accurately. This activity is one in a series of three activities.

Interactive resource

Jet force: championship

Shoot a disc at a target to score goals. Control the direction of the disc by applying linear forces. Use a single linear force or combine multiple forces. Take turns competing against a friend. Score points by aiming accurately. This activity is one in a series of three activities.