Close message

Search results

Listed under:  Science  >  Forces and energy  >  Fundamental forces  >  Gravity
Video

Catalyst: Why do astronauts float in space?

Have you wondered what it would be like to be an astronaut floating around in the International Space Station? In this clip, Catalyst's Dr Derek Muller investigates what causes this weightlessness in space. Derek challenges some people visiting the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney to explain why they think astronauts float. ...

Interactive

Forces

Students use this resource consisting of seven slides with diagrams, written explanation and voice-over to understand what forces are and what they can do. There is a two-question quiz and a summary slide.

Interactive

Uses of Satellites

Students use this resource consisting of five slides with diagrams, written explanation and voice-over to understand some uses of artificial satellites including geostationary satellites. Uses identified include telecommunications, weather forecasting and spying. There is a two-question quiz and a summary slide.

Interactive

experiMENTALS: Magic rocking candle

This resource contains a materials and instruction list and brief explanation for students about the process of burning both ends of a balancing candle. This activity is most likely to be done as a teacher demonstration for safety and classroom management reasons, particularly at primary school level.

Interactive

experiMENTALS: Keys on a shoelace

This resource contains a materials and instruction list and brief explanation for students to show that keys on a shoelace can do some unexpected things.

Interactive

Gravity

Students use this resource consisting of four slides with diagrams, written explanation and voice-over to understand that gravity is a force of attraction which acts on Earth towards the centre of the planet, and that the size of the force of gravity depends on the mass of each object and the distance between them. There ...

Interactive

Satellites

Students use this resource consisting of eight slides with diagrams, written explanation and voice-over to understand that the moon is a natural satellite of the Earth and how satellites stay in orbit around the Earth. There is a two-question quiz and a summary slide.

Video

Catalyst: Applying trigonometry: leaning tower

The Leaning Tower of Gingin is the centrepiece of the Gravity Discovery Centre. The Catalyst team of Derek, Simon and Anja drop watermelons from the tower, to examine the rate at which they fall. They are testing Galileo's theory about falling objects. The dimensions of the tower provide an opportunity to apply some basic ...

Video

Can We Help?: Effects of g-force on the human body

Peter Rowsthorn visits the Australian International Air Show to answer the question, 'What effect does g-force have on the human body?' Join Pete in the cockpit of a light plane for some aerobatics with pilot David Pilkington. G-force expert Dr David Newman explains the science as Pete endures up to 6 g in the aircraft.

Video

Catalyst: The physics of a slinky drop

Imagine holding a slinky by the top end, with the bottom end dangling in mid-air. What do you think would happen when you let it go? Explore the physics of two equal and opposing forces working on an object in this awesome experiment!

Interactive

Energy skate park

This is an interactive resource about the potential and kinetic energy changes as a skater rolls around a skate park. Students learn about conservation of energy with a skater, they can build tracks, ramps and jumps for the skater and view the kinetic energy, potential energy and friction as he moves. Students can also ...

Text

Space debris map

This is a reference resource for teachers that consists of a single web page providing visual and written information about the location of, and hazards associated with, space debris. This space junk includes old non-functional satellites, as well as parts of and debris from satellites, spacecraft and rockets that continue ...

Interactive

Gravity and orbits

This is an interactive teaching and learning resource that years 7 to 10 secondary students can use to simulate the orbits of the Earth, Moon and a space station while altering the physical quantities involved. Orbital pathways, velocity and force vectors can be displayed in either scale or cartoon views. The mass and velocity ...

Interactive

Projectile motion

This is an interactive resource about projectile motion. Students use a simulation of a cannon to fire various objects. They can set the firing angle, initial speed, height and mass, with or without air resistance. Students are encouraged to make a game out of this simulation by trying to hit a target. This interactive ...

Text

Do-it-yourself podcast

This resource for educators and students details a do-it-yourself podcast activity that gives students the opportunity to host a show featuring astronauts conducting experiments on the International Space Station, or NASA experts explaining scientific concepts. A set of NASA audio and video clips is provided, along with ...

Video

Ramping it up, Egyptian pyramid style

How did the ancient Egyptians move and lift huge stones during construction of the pyramids? Secondary student Angus Atkinson designed an experiment to find out how the lives of pyramid workers could have been made easier. See how as you watch this video, which he entered in the 2013 Sleek Geeks Eureka Science Schools Prize.

Video

Experimentals: Do different things fall faster?

Want to find out what happens when you drop a watermelon and an apple from the top of a building? In this clip, Bernie Hobbs and Ruben Meerman, investigate whether the mass of an object influences how fast it falls. Bernie and Ruben ride the 'Giant Drop' at Dreamworld, drop a watermelon and apple from an eighth floor balcony, ...

Interactive

Spacewalk game

This is an interactive resource that explores the International Space Station through a Station Spacewalk Game in which participants conduct virtual NASA repair work on the International Space Station. In the game, participants leave the airlock and complete tasks executed by astronauts to help power up the space station ...

Video

Meet the BFFs: Four fundamental forces

We all know something about gravity, but what about the other fundamental forces of physics? Explore the properties of two familiar forces experienced in daily life, and of two less familiar ones. How do they interact, and what keeps everything from falling apart? This video was Kate Dent's entry into the 2013 Sleek Geeks ...

Video

Measuring gravity

Did you know you can measure gravity? The more mass an object has, the more gravity it has, so by measuring the mass of something, you can figure out its gravity. Why do you think climate scientists may want these measurements? Watch this NASA animation to find out.