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Listed under:  Language  >  Language modes  >  Creating texts  >  Personal responses
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'Incy Wincy Spider' sung by Teddy Rock

Watch and listen to Buzz, Belle and Bop perform the traditional nursery rhyme 'Incy Wincy Spider' in this animated music video. Use the rhyme, sung with a rock beat by Teddy Rock, to discuss, order and retell events.

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Comparing the book and the film of 'The Hobbit'

Have you ever read a book and then seen the film version of it? Did you think it was well done or could it have been done differently? In this panel interview presented by Michael Cathcart, academics Mark Atherton and Lynette Porter talk about the things that influenced J.R.R. Tolkien in writing 'The Hobbit'. They also ...

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The creation of Trowenna

Different cultures around the world have their own creation stories, explaining how this planet and all the places on it were formed. These stories can tell us much about what is important to each culture. This story, from the Nuenonne people of Bruny Island, explains how Tasmania, known to them as Trowenna, was formed.

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Teddy Rock's 'Twinkle, twinkle little star'!

Sing along with Buzz, Belle and Bop as they perform 'Twinkle, twinkle little star' in this animated music video. Then have some fun exploring rhyme and description as you create your own verse for this classic nursery rhyme.

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Judging WikiLeaks

What do you know about WikiLeaks? People are divided on whether this secretive whistle-blower organisation is irresponsible and illegal or whether it makes those it targets more accountable. This ABC news radio report was aired on 27 July 2010.

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Evolving English: the impact of television

Imagine if the English language never evolved. What would we be speaking? Possibly Old English, the language of the Anglo-Saxon tribes, a language written down using runes known as the 'futhorc'. English continues to evolve, but it takes the media to bring new words into common usage. So which form of media is responsible ...

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The Awabakal language of the Newcastle area

The Awabakal language, once common in the area now known as Newcastle, was almost 'lost'. It is being brought back to life using old texts and translations left by an early missionary. In this audio clip, listen to a discussion about the importance of reconstructing the Awabakal language and the challenges this poses.

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Learning Dharug, Aboriginal language of Sydney

Imagine a time when the Aboriginal language Dharug was the official language spoken in the Sydney area. During this audio clip, reflect on how the language was considered almost 'lost', but (and) discover how Richard Green and others are piecing the Dharug language back together. Find out about how it is being taught at ...

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Re-awakening Australian Aboriginal languages

Did you know that before colonisation there were about 250 distinct Aboriginal and Torres Strait lslander languages being spoken across Australia? Today, however, the majority of these languages are endangered. Listen to a number of significant Australians discussing the Aboriginal language situation in Australia today. ...

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Teaching Aboriginal languages in schools

Would you like to learn another language? This audio recording features a number of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians discussing both the teaching of Aboriginal languages in schools and the benefits that this teaching offers all Australians.

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The secrets to Paul Jennings's success

Imagine being a best-selling author who receives 5000 fan letters a year! That's what it's like for Paul Jennings, one of Australia's most successful children's authors. But what makes Jennings's books so loved by children around the world? In this clip, learn that knowing your audience is key to an author's success.

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A Song about a sulphur-crested cockatoo

Do you know any songs about Australian animals? Listen to this song about sulphur-crested cockatoos performed by Don Spencer. Get a close up look at a sulphur-crested cockatoo and see the antics (funny actions) it gets up to.

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'Hey diddle diddle' sung by Teddy Rock

Watch and listen as Buzz, Belle and Bop perform 'Hey diddle diddle' in this animated music video. Then try to create your own sentences that include pairs of words that sound the same at the end (rhyme).

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'Sing a song of sixpence' sung by Teddy Rock

Watch and listen to Buzz, Belle and Bop perform the nursery rhyme 'Sing a song of sixpence' in this animated music video. Find out where the king was, what the queen was doing and what happened to the maid. Have fun retelling the story.

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'This old man' sung by Teddy Rock

Watch and listen to Teddy Rock perform the nursery rhyme 'This old man' in this animated music video. Then have some fun with counting and rhyme as you create and perform new verses for the song.

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Creating Australian stories: author May Gibbs

How do storybook writers, illustrators and cartoonists find their inspiration? Find out how May Gibbs, a famous Australian author and illustrator, used the Australian bush to create the children's classic 'Snugglepot and Cuddlepie' and the 'Gumnut Babies'.

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'It's raining, it's pouring' sung by Teddy Rock

Watch and listen as Buzz, Belle and Bop sing the nursery rhyme 'It's raining, it's pouring' in this animated music video. Next, see if you can think of some other things that might happen to the old man.

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Dorothea Mackellar's 'My country' as a song

Do you know a poem with the line 'I love a sunburnt country'? The poem is 'My country' by Dorothea Mackellar. Find out what inspired Mackellar to write this famous poem and how she felt about teenager Christine Roberts basing a song on it. This is a black-and-white clip from a 1967 current affairs program This Day Tonight.

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Moby Dick

What was Herman Melville aiming for when he wrote his masterpiece? Listen to Jennifer Byrne, David Malouf, Marieke Hardy, Jason Steger and Johanna Featherstone discuss their reactions to 'Moby Dick'. Is the novel just a detailed treatise (commentary) on whales and whaling, or is it an allegory (fable) teaching us about ...

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Australianness of 'Cloudstreet'

Could 'Cloudstreet' be the great Australian novel? Jennifer Byrne, Peter Garrett, Mem Fox, Marieke Hardy and Jason Steger discuss Tim Winton's novel, trying to pinpoint just what makes it a classic example of modern Australian writing. This panel discussion is aimed at people who have already read 'Cloudstreet'.