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Listed under:  Science  >  Life  >  Plant structure and function  >  Plant reproduction
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Where would we bee without them? video

This is a video about bees and their importance for Australian agricultural production. Intended for mid-primary students, the video is presented by Trevor Weatherhead of the Australian Honey Bee Industry Council. He describes how numerous plants, such as the pumpkin crops seen in the video, are dependent on bees for pollination. ...

Teacher resource

Where would we bee without them?

This is a unit of work about bees and their vital role in the food chain and in agricultural production. The unit supports primary students to understand the basic biology of bees and to differentiate between native bees and the introduced honey bees. The unit is divided into a number of activities that focus on: bee anatomy; ...

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Botanical model of a lilac flower, 1865-84

This is a botanical model of a lilac flower, manufactured in France sometime between 1865 and 1884. It is made of painted papier-mâché and mounted on a circular wooden stand. The model features a tall stem that is removable in two parts. The green section of the stem can be removed from the wooden stand, while the flower ...

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Vegetable gardens

Have you ever grown vegetables? In this clip you will discover many things about vegies and how they grow. Presenter Nick Hardcastle will even show you how to make a vegetable garden in a box. Find out which vegetable is actually a flower, which are the best seasons for planting and picking, and how deep to bury seeds.

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Sending seeds into space

Why might we need to keep a collection of seeds from all over the world? Where would we keep a collection like that? Should we send some of them into space? Watch this clip to reveal answers to all these questions and more.

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Fungi: how they grow

If a mushroom is not a plant, what is it? Discover a group of living things that are neither animals nor plants. Explore the mysterious world of fungi and find out the conditions that they need before they can grow.

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Uses of herbs: past and present

Learn about some of the most useful plants in the home. Find out how some different herbs have been used throughout history and are used today.

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How seeds become plants

Did you know that a coconut and a walnut are actually seeds? Tiny or huge, prickly or smooth, seeds contain everything a plant needs to start a new life. Watch this clip and find out how seeds get around, and what they need to start growing. Presenter Nick Hardcastle will even show you how to grow your own plants from seed.

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Wattleseed: a promising new cooking ingredient

If you were a farmer, what native plants could you grow to provide a new food crop? Find out how Mark Lucas, a South Australian farmer, makes use of scientific research and innovative chefs to create a market for a new native plant food product.

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Fruit: why plants make them

Fruits come in all shapes and colours. Have you ever wondered why plants make them? Discover an amazing variety of fruits. Learn the secret of these little plant packages and the treasures they protect.

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How plants work

Plants are the only living things that can make their own food. They do this during the day while it's light, using a process called photosynthesis, which uses carbon dioxide and produces oxygen. During the day and night plants take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide through respiration. Discover just how important plants ...

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Flowers: living factories for making seeds

Can you imagine a world without flowers? Flowers add colour, scent and beauty to our world. But why do plants make them? Discover the real purpose of flowers and how they do their job.

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Developing bush tucker into a seed crop

Which native plant might provide a ready-made crop that could be used as a very nutritious food source? Meet two South Australian growers who are investigating just such a native crop. Find out more about the seed crop that does not require significant amounts of water or fertiliser and has a long history of use by Indigenous ...

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Native plant seed bank

Did you know there is a special bank in which Australian native plant seeds are deposited? In this clip, Gardening Australia presenter, Angus Stewart visits the Australian Botanic Garden at Mount Annan to investigate the work of a seed bank. Find out about the process the scientists at the seed bank use to obtain and prepare ...

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Growing apples

Do you like eating apples? This clip shows where apples are grown. Learn how the apple farmer (orchardist) looks after the apple trees so they can grow lots of healthy fruit.

Interactive Resource

Sites2See: Garden materials to grow an idea

A page with links to a range of gardening and horticulture resources, including a video interview and tour with plant scientist Tim Entwistle and sites with planting guides and tips for vegetable gardening.

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Science learning: artificial pollination

This is a web resource providing a video and transcript about research into the pollination of kiwifruit by honey bees and artificially. A research scientist explains what artificial pollination is, why it is needed for kiwifruit and the method used. Footage shows a researcher working on kiwifruit vines and in the laboratory, ...

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Science learning: avocado research

This is a web resource providing a video and transcript about the pollination of avocado flowers. The video focuses on research aiming to increase fruit production from pollination by honey bees. A research scientist describes how avocado flowers change sex daily to avoid self-pollination and explains that pollination by ...

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Marla Spivak: Why bees are disappearing

This is a video of a TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) talk by Professor Marla Spivak about the dramatic decline in the number of bees. The 16-minute video begins with a discussion of why humans should care about bees, including their critical importance for the world's food supply. Professor Spivak explains that ...

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What's up, honey bee?

Around the world, honey bee populations are in decline. Discover here that, whilst scientists continue to investigate the causes of this phenomenon, beekeepers are facing a battle to keep their bees alive. Find out how declining bee numbers might threaten the global food supply.