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Heat changes everything

In this learning sequence, students explore a simple particle model for matter, heat energy and thermal expansion. They apply their learning to the context of expansion and contraction of rail lines and investigate ways that this is mitigated in real situations involving rail lines. They subsequently explain this to young ...

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Steam or just a load of hot air?

Take a journey with two 2013 Sleek Geeks Eureka Science Schools Prize finalists, as they present their take on the history of steam power. See how they link steam power, the properties of water and the way energy is converted. WARNING: if flickering light affects you, you may be best to avoid watching this video.

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Experimentals: Recycling household items

Discover why plastic is harmful to our environment and how recycling helps to reduce its impact. Listen to Jon Dee, founder of Planet Ark, discuss the problem of plastic. Watch as a bag of household items are sorted to identify what can be recycled.

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Elliot and the Surfing Scientist: Getting iron out of breakfast cereal

You probably know your body needs iron and that you can get it from the foods you eat. Join the Surfing Scientist team as they attempt to extract iron from a bowl of breakfast cereal. What method do you think they will use?

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For the Juniors: How do you make bread?

Have you ever made bread? This clip shows a girl learning to make bread at home with her mother. You will also see how different types of bread are made.

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Elliot and the Surfing Scientist: From chocolate buttons to magic patterns

Want to do a simple science experiment that works just like a magic trick? Watch the Surfing Scientist to find out how. He creates a pattern made up of regular shapes by dissolving coated chocolate buttons.

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Graphene: The new wonder material

Graphene is perhaps the most significant new material produced in recent years. It has many potential applications in electrical devices, biomedical technology and solar energy. Graphene is a form (allotrope) of carbon with some special chemical and physical properties. Watch this clip to explore the molecular structure, ...

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Elliot and the Surfing Scientist: Pepper scatter experiment

Watch what happens in this pepper scatter experiment by Surfing Scientist, Ruben Meerman. Ruben demonstrates an important property of water, surface tension, by dipping a toothpick into water sprinkled with pepper. Find out what happens when detergent is added.

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BTN: Daily bread

Do you eat bread? How often? Discover why bread has been important for human survival for thousands of years. Find out how to find the healthiest types of bread to eat. See how you can make your own bread at home.

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Can We Help?: Artificial eyes: how are they made?

To answer the question 'Are glass eyes really made of glass?' Peter Rowsthorn visits an ocularist who makes artificial eyes. Join him as he investigates how these eyes are made. Witness the skill of an ocularist, Jenny Geelen, as she creates an artificial eye to match Pete's existing eyes.

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For the Juniors: Milk from the dairy to the shop

Have you ever wondered about the steps involved in getting milk from a cow to you? This clip tells the story of milk, from the dairy farm to the supermarket. Discover where cream comes from and how milk is made safe to drink.

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Can We Help?: Exploring nanotechnology

Peter Binks, CEO of Nanotechnology Victoria, answers the question 'How does nanotechnology work?' Discover what nanotechnology is and see several examples in action, such as scratch-resistant paint used in the car industry. Consider future applications of nanotechnology in areas such as sports, health care, clothing and cleaning.

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Tough zirconium - but what's its secret side?

The element zirconium is often used for its tough, abrasive properties. It also has a secret side. View this clip (developed by students for the 2013 Sleek Geeks Eureka Science Schools Prize competition), which highlights the properties and uses of zirconium in a highly visual and fun way.

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Elliot and the Surfing Scientist: Implode a soft drink can using an invisible force

Can you imagine being able to crush a can without hitting or squashing it? Watch as Ruben the Surfing Scientist shows you how this can be done. Listen to Ruben explain the science behind the imploding can and find out what invisible force is involved.

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Elliot and the Surfing Scientist: Properties and behaviour of gases

All substances are made up of tiny particles. A change in temperature can change the way these particles behave. Watch as the Surfing Scientist demonstrates how a gas behaves when it is heated. Find out whether the balloon gets sucked or pushed into the bottle!

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DIY Sun Science - iTunes app

Try some hands on investigations that relate to learning about the Sun. Follow step-by-step procedures, read through explanations to find out why things happened and also view related video clips. Free when reviewed on 12/5/2015.

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For the Juniors: Picking and processing fresh apples

Discover the story of apples, from picking and pressing to processing in a factory. Learn how juice, cider and vinegar are made from apples. See how many other things are made from apples.

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Elliot and the Surfing Scientist: The surface tension of water

Imagine you could walk on water! Some insects can do just that. Watch as the Surfing Scientist uses a paperclip and a glass of water to demonstrate how this is possible.

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Elliot and the Surfing Scientist: Get Blown Away With This Air Experiment

Substances exist in different states depending on the temperature. Watch the Surfing Scientist have a popping good time as he demonstrates this phenomenon. Don't forget to block your ears!

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Elliot and the Surfing Scientist: Evaporating liquid nitrogen

Can you imagine a liquid that turns into a gas at minus 196 degrees Celsius? Watch as the Surfing Scientist explores the change in properties of liquid nitrogen as it evaporates in a series of experiments that go 'pop'!