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Listed under:  Health  >  Physical activity  >  Physical fitness  >  Human movement  >  Fundamental movement skills  >  Object control skills  >  Throwing
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Yulunga: tambil tambil

In many areas of Australia people played skills practice games, where they threw objects at each other. These included sticks, mud and stones of various sizes. A spear-dodging game called tambil tambil (refers to the blunt spears used) was played by the Jagara (Jagera) people of the Brisbane area, as part of sham fights ...

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Yulunga: weet weet

The throwing of the play-stick, commonly called the weet weet (‘wit-wit’) was a popular activity among Aboriginal people in some parts of Australia, and various contests were held. The weet weet was often referred to as the ‘kangaroo rat’, because when thrown correctly its flight resembled the leaping action of this small ...

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Yulunga: wirrwuyu

As in various other cultures, stone skipping (throwing) along a surface of water was played by Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. On Dunk Island in Queensland, the throwing of cuttle-fish (krooghar) bones was observed. The bones were thrown along the surface of the water like ‘skipping stones’ and ...

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Yulunga: sanbaing

In parts of Papua New Guinea and the Torres Strait Islands players of both genders were observed playing a game of sand-ball throwing. It required a great deal of expertise to perform successfully and was often played all day. Players make ‘bombs’ out of sand and throw (lob) them into the water. The Yulunga: Traditional ...

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Yulunga: gugiyn nahri

The activities outlined are examples of how the games can be modified to be used in a tabloid event. Groups of four to six players over a two to three-minute time period are recommended. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation ...

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Yulunga: yiri

A spear game was recorded being played by the boys at Ulladulla in New South Wales. Small spears were thrown at pieces of wood, which were placed into running water. On Dunk Island in Queensland the boys used wood chips and pieces of bark floating on the water, or threw at small fish. This is a throwing-practice game played ...

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Yulunga: battendi

A spear game was played by Aboriginal people in the Lake Murray, Lake Alexandrina and Lake Albert areas of southern Australia. A prize such as a newly made shield was offered to the winner. The contest was in two parts: distance throwing and target throwing. This is a distance-and-accuracy throwing contest using a woomera ...

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Yulunga: chiba

At Clump Point in north Queensland, regular mock warfare tournaments were held. These were called chiba or malla. The name of the actual site where it took place in the close neighbourhood was called yirri. In Cairns the Yidinji people called this activity puloga. A game of mock warfare between two groups, using ‘sponge’ ...

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Yulunga: riawena

Riawena means ‘fun (sport)’ in the language used by the Aboriginal people of the Oyster Bay area of Tasmania. A number of the games and activities can be conducted as athletic events. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation ...

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Yulunga: bari barlam bembinge

This is a suggested outline of a traditional games event. The games and activities outlined have been modified for use with co-educational classes and groups of different age and/or abilities, as a workshop or traditional games activity over a time period of one hour to one and a half hours. Groups of six to 12 may be used. ...

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Yulunga: woomera

A woomera or throwing stick was used by Aboriginal boys and men in all parts of Australia to propel spears with great force, often over considerable distances. On Dunk Island in Queensland a favourite target for spear-throwing contests was the white ant nests hanging from the gum trees. This is a throwing competition for ...

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Yulunga: kolap

This object-throwing game was observed being played on Mer Island in the Torres Strait region in the nineteenth century. More recent versions have also been observed. A game based on throwing accuracy. Teams of one to two players throw objects, attempting to make them land on a target on the ground. The Yulunga: Traditional ...

Online

Yulunga: yulunga

Yulunga means ‘playing’ in the language of the Kamilaroi (Gamori) people from the northwest of New South Wales. The following games and activities may be organised as part of a display of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander games. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians ...

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Yulunga: koolchee koolchee

This ball-throwing and hitting game was played by the Diyari people from near Lake Eyre in South Australia. The balls were called koolchee. The aim of the activity is to roll a ball to hit a skittle. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding ...

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Yulunga: yeeboo ngandoonyoo

In most parts of Australia young boys played fighting games or mock combat games for enjoyment and as a practice for adult life. In one part of Australia the boys would rise early in the morning to practise their self-taught skills of spear throwing. The little boys also indulged in imitating the skills of fighting as practised ...

Online

Yulunga: mer kolap

This object-throwing game was observed being played in the Torres Strait on Mer Island in the nineteenth century. More recent versions have been observed. This version of an object-throwing game is a relay event. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding ...