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Listed under:  Health  >  Psychology  >  Personality  >  Personal identity  >  Beliefs  >  Values (Psychology)
Video

Menzies' 'Forgotten people' speech, 2008

'Menzies' forgotten people speech' is an excerpt from the film 'Menzies and Churchill at war' (55 min) produced in 2008. Using Robert Menzies's Second World War diaries and remarkable 16-mm film, 'Menzies and Churchill at war' lifts the lid on a bitter behind-the-scenes battle between Winston Churchill and the Australian ...

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Brick from the Great Wall of China, 1368-1644

This is a rectangular fired clay-brick from the Great Wall of China. The brick is presented within a timber display frame on four curved legs with a removable lid.

Video

'Father', 2007

This is a short animated film made in 2007 about a boy trying to understand his father, a post-World War II refugee from Lithuania. His father is mainly silent and difficult to understand when he does speak. He is a heavy drinker who leaves the family when the narrator is 15. The animation begins and ends with an expression ...

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Home sweet home: the 'Australian Dream'

Would you rather live in a freestanding house on a large block in an outer suburb or in an apartment with the convenience of being closer to the city centre? This clip from a 1968 Four Corners program explores the 'Australian Dream' of home ownership and attempts to discover why it became so important to the post-World ...

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Suburban sprawl reaches Doncaster East, 1960s

In the 1950s and 60s, suburbs like Doncaster East arose to meet the changing needs of Australian citizens and the government. A 'baby boom' and increased immigration contributed to the expansion of Australian cities as more and more people sought to create their own 'Australian Dream' on a quarter-acre suburban block. Architect ...

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Portraying the Exxon Valdez oil spill, 19 years on

Ever heard the phrase 'there are two sides to every story'? While some texts might seem to present both sides of the story, close analysis can often reveal otherwise. This clip from Foreign Correspondent explores some arguments about the after-effects of one of the world's worst oil-spills. The spill occurred in 1989 when ...

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Greenpeace takes a stand against GM crops

Watch Greenpeace activists mow down a research crop of genetically modified (GM) wheat grown by CSIRO. Consider some arguments for and against GM foods and find out the number of GM crops being trialled around Australia.

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Japanese tsunami's nuclear threat, 2011

Remember the earthquake and following tsunami that hit Japan in March 2011 and damaged a nuclear power plant? Find out about the damage caused, what exploded and why, and the aftermath of the disaster. What debates about nuclear power plants were reignited by the events in Japan?

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GM bananas

Meet a scientist who is genetically modifying bananas to make them more nutritious. Learn about some of the benefits and concerns about using gene technologies to modify foods.

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Who funds GM research trials?

Genetically modified (GM) foods are expensive to develop. They are often created through research partnerships between publicly funded scientists and private corporations. This offers advantages but also raises concerns about research objectivity and potential bias. Explore some of the issues surrounding the commercialisation ...

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The Earth's warming

How might the Earth's warming affect humans in the future? In this clip some possible extreme consequences of taking no action on reducing greenhouse emissions are raised.

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The language of criticism

Language is a powerful tool and the way it is used can sometimes disempower or devalue people and their ideas. Listen to young art critic and aspiring painter Robert Hughes as he discusses the Beat Generation. Explore how questions can be used to influence listeners and how language can reveal the attitudes and values of ...

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The value of Shakespeare

Many of us are resistant to studying the works of William Shakespeare but we use Shakespearean language every day. In this clip, explore young writer Kate Tempest's passion for Shakespeare and hear her recite her poem referencing many of his words and phrases that are still in common usage today.

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Endangered Mala returned to natural habitat

Have you ever heard of the Australian marsupial called a Mala? Perhaps not, because this creature (also known as the Rufous Hare-wallaby), has been extinct in the wild for decades. Find out about a project to re-introduce the Mala into Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park. Learn also about the significance of this marsupial ...

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Cloning stem cells

Cell cloning involves making an exact copy of a cell. Geneticists have discovered that cell cloning can be used to create large numbers of stem cells. Stem-cell therapy holds much hope for the treatment of some of our most debilitating genetic diseases. Watch this clip to learn more about this exciting breakthrough and ...

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Checking the facts

Giant asteroid heads toward Earth! Imagine the uproar if that was the headline on today's newspaper but it turned out that the reporter hadn't checked the facts and there was no imminent catastrophe. Checking your facts is of vital importance. In this clip, meet Australian Amelia Lester, whose job is to do just that with ...

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Redefining marriage: analysing an argument

Why do people get married? Around the world, some people marry for love while others marry for social or pragmatic reasons, including economic ones. In this clip, filmed in 1973, explore the arguments of leading anthropologist Dr Margaret Mead as she challenges many of the ideas about marriage that were current at the time.

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Writing from the fringe

Imagine a mysterious island with a wild, rugged landscape and a history of tragedy and hardship. But it is also an island of unrivalled beauty with a purity of nature rarely found today. Sound like something out of a novel? Well, it's Tasmania and it has inspired the writing of many novels, not the least of which are those ...

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Stories that bite: our fascination with vampires

From medieval folklore to multiplex cinemas, few monsters capture our imaginations as vampires do. Why is it that we have such a morbid fascination with the undead? Not all vampires are the same, though. In this clip, explore some of the explanations for the changing nature of vampires in literature.

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The influence of context on our reading choices

Explore the concept of the cult novel. In this clip, listen to a Jennifer Byrne Presents panel discussion about the factors that influence our appreciation of books and about how our appreciation of books changes over time.