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Listed under:  Health  >  Physical activity  >  Sports  >  Combat sports  >  Wrestling
Video

Allied soldiers' athletics carnival, c1918 - asset 3

This is an excerpt from a segment in a black-and-white silent newsreel. Filmed in England, the footage shows two men wrestling in an open-air ring, with a large number of soldier spectators watching from the hillside at the rear. An officer at the side of the ring appears to be noting points scored, while the referee in ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: kari-woppa

A wrestling game was played by the people in the Torrens area of South Australia. The contests were generally held on the meeting of groups from different areas. Players wrestled for a tuft of emu feathers called a kari-woppa. Komba burrong or kambong burrong (the game of ‘catching hold’) was the name of a similar game ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: boojur kombang

A wrestling game of the Noongar people of the south-west of Western Australia was called meetcha kambong (‘nut game’) or boojur kombang (‘ground game’). In the Swan district it was called boojoor-eleeja. A team beaten at this game might resume the contest in a month or so. A ‘wrestling’ game where attaching players attempt ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: epoo korio

Epoo korio was a wrestling game of the Kiwai people of Papua and some people in the northern parts of the Torres Strait Island region. This is a team game in which attackers attempt to knock over a mound of sand and defenders try to stop them. The level of physical contact is controlled. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: Garumba

Teams from far and wide gathered at a ‘place of wrestling’ (at Dingulami) in Kabi Kabi territory in south Queensland each year at the time when the bunya nuts were ready. Tingalpa near Brisbane was also a wrestling place. Only one team represented each group attending. Two players came from each totem of a group. Each pair ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: kal boming

The Kal boming (fire-hitting) game was played by the Noongar people in the southern districts of Western Australia and called for both agility and strength. A fire was lit either on the ground or the top of a Balga or Xanthorrhoea (‘grass tree’). The players divided themselves into two teams. One side tried to put the fire ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: meetcha kambong

A wrestling game of the Noongar people of the southwest of Western Australia was called meetcha kambong (‘nut game’) or boojur kombang (‘ground game’). In the Swan district it was called boojoor-eleeja. A team beaten at this game might resume the contest in a month or so. A ‘wrestling’ game where attacking players attempt ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: tingalpa

Teams from far and wide gathered at a ‘place of wrestling’ (at Dingulami) in Kabi Kabi territory in south Queensland each year at the time when the bunya nuts were ready. Tingalpa near Brisbane was also a wrestling place. Only one team represented each group attending. Two players came from each part (totem) of a group. ...

Teacher resource

Yulunga: Tur-dur-er-rin

The lessons learned around the camp fire were often required for survival. Tur-dur-er-rin, war-rok-minder- neit, or work-ern-der-eit, was a wrestling game from Victoria in which the most skilful, or perhaps the strongest, proved to be the winner. The old men and women and the children acted as spectators and sat down around ...