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History / Year 8 / Historical Knowledge and Understanding

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

The way of life in shogunate Japan, including social, cultural, economic and political features (including the feudal system and the increasing power of the shogun) (ACDSEH012)

Elaborations
  • describing the way of life in feudal Japan under the shoguns (for example, ‘bushido’ – the chivalric code of conduct of the samurai that emphasised frugality, loyalty, mastery of martial arts, and honour)
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding Ethical understanding
Cross-curriculum priorities
ScOT terms

Social history,  Lifestyles,  Feudalism,  Shogunates,  Japanese history

Video

Shoguns rule Japan with iron fists

Who were the shoguns and how did they rule Japan? In Japanese history, the time from about 1600 to 1868 is called the Edo period. In 1600, after centuries of wars, Japan came under the control of shoguns from the Tokugawa clan. They continued to rule until 1868, when they were overthrown. View this clip to discover how ...

Video

The end of Japan's isolation

Under the shoguns, Japan was deliberately isolated from the outside world from around 1600 CE. However, by the mid-19th century, Western imperialism was entering a new phase of expansion that no Asian state was able to resist. Discover what happened when the West came beating on the doors of a closed society. This clip ...

Video

Japan's shoguns keep everyone in their places

What was the status of each social class in shogunate Japan? During the period from around 1600 to 1868, Japan was a feudal society. As in medieval Europe, each group had its place in a strict social order. Watch this clip to discover the roles of each group during the age when the Tokugawa shoguns ruled the country. This ...

Video

Rebuilding a Shinto shrine

Witness the dedication of the followers of Shinto, Japan's ancient and unique religious tradition. Shinto means 'the way of the spirits', and it grew out of older beliefs that spirits inhabit mountains, forests and other natural places. Watch this clip from 2007 to see a 1,300-year-old Shinto tradition in central Japan.

Video

Outback House - meeting the participants

Imagine leaving your home to travel back to a time over 150 years ago, to live and work on an outback farm. Sixteen Australians take part in a reality TV show about life on Oxley Downs, a sheep station built to look and work as a real station would have in the 1860s. Meet some of the participants and find out what job they ...

Video

Reality plays

In these days of reality TV and selfies it seems hard to imagine that plays focusing on ordinary people and their lives were once regarded as revolutionary. Van Badham, recent associate artist (writing) at Malthouse Theatre, discusses the historical context of the Henrik Ibsen play 'The Wild Duck'. She explores how it and ...

Video

Surrender: the only option for the Son of Heaven

The Japanese surrender at the end of World War II was preceded by a heavy bombing campaign by the Allied forces, culminating in the use of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Germany had already surrendered, and with the devastation wrought on his country, it was inevitable that Japan's Emperor Hirohito would follow ...

Video

Outback House: Mal's perspective

Imagine leaving your home to travel back to about 150 years ago, to live and work on an outback farm. Sixteen Australians take part in a reality TV show about life on 'Oxley Downs', a sheep station built to look and work like an 1860s station. Join Mal Burns, a station hand and member of the Wiradjuri people, as he builds ...

Video

Fast trains

A proposed fast train route between Sydney and Canberra could cut down rail travel times from nearly five hours to one. The project is costly and won't be available for about 20 years. Will the economic, social and environmental benefits of such a project be worth the costs?

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Whadjuk country

Ever wondered what life was like for the traditional owners of Perth before the British arrived in 1829? Whadjuk [pronounced wod-JUK] Noongar Elder and ambassador Dr Noel Nannup talks about traditional Whadjuk ways of life and key cultural places in Perth, and he teaches us the Noongar words for some Perth suburbs (such ...

Video

Sweet, merry and bright Danish Christmas delights

How did people from Denmark celebrate Christmas in 1983? Kirsten and her mother cook traditional Danish biscuits and a special rice pudding with a hidden surprise. See how a Danish family might decorate their home for Christmas. Can you tell that this film was made a long time ago?

Video

Whadjuk people displaced

Noongar Whadjuk [pronounced wod-JUK] Elder and ambassador Dr Noel Nannup speaks about the "tall ships" arriving in 1829 to establish the Swan River Colony, the cultural misunderstandings and resistance that occurred and the effects of colonisation on the traditional Aboriginal ways of life.

Video

Dancing in the streets of Beijing

In megacities, finding room for millions of people to live and work sometimes pushes other land uses aside. In Beijing, space for recreational activities is extremely limited, so one group of 'grannies' has taken to dancing in the streets! But even this space-saving solution is not without its detractors.

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Building the Sydney Opera House

Construction of the Sydney Opera House began in 1959. The Opera House was intended to be more than a building; it was meant to be a landmark that would put Sydney on the world map as a centre of culture. In this short, silent clip, discover some of the work that went into constructing this huge, unique and very complex building.

Audio

William Cuffay: Chartist, son of a freed slave

Who was William Cuffay? This extract from a radio program 'The Isle of Denial: William Cuffay in Van Diemen's Land' introduces us to Cuffay, the son of a freed Caribbean slave and one of the biggest names in Britain's and Australia's movements for civil rights. It explains that, despite his fame and notoriety in the middle ...

Video

Tokugawa shogunate is overthrown

How did Japan's Tokugawa shogunate come to an end? The entry of the US fleet into Tokyo Bay in 1853 and the events that followed exposed the shogunate's policy of isolation as a potential threat to the country. Western influence, and Japan's response to it, would have an enormous impact on the country's future. This clip ...

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Learn about carbon offsets with Dirt Girl

Do you know what a carbon footprint is? Join Dirt Girl, Scrap Boy and Costa to find out! In this video, carbon emissions are measured in balloons. The Sydney Opera House measured the carbon footprint of Dirt Girl's recent show. How many balloons worth of carbon did it produce? What did the Sydney Opera House do to offset ...

Video

Farming genius: the real wealth of the Inca

Discover the remarkable world of the Inca. Before Spanish conquistadors arrived in the 16th century, the Inca Empire was the largest in the Americas. In this clip from the 1985 documentary 'Sweat of the Sun, Tears of the Moon', ABC reporter Jack Pizzey investigates the agricultural practices of the ancient Inca. He discusses ...

Video

Trading for food in Medieval Europe

What are the essential things you need to survive? Food, water, medicine, shelter, sanitation ... anything else? How do you obtain these basic requirements? How might people living in Medieval Europe have survived if they had no money or land? In this clip, discover a useful practice that helped peasants negotiate a living. ...

Image

Mapping the Australian Coast

This collection focuses on the European mapping and naming of the Australian continent during the 17th and 18th centuries. It highlights the motivations and achievements of Dutch and British explorers, including Abel Tasman and James Cook. It incorporates maps, texts, and a painting.