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History / Year 7 / Historical Knowledge and Understanding

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Methods and sources used to investigate at least ONE historical controversy or mystery that has challenged historians or archaeologists, such as in the analysis of unidentified human remains  (ACDSEH030)

Elaborations
  • evaluating various methods for investigating the ancient past (for example, stratigraphy to date discoveries; DNA testing to identify past individuals from their remains (such as Egyptian mummies) as well as common diseases)
  • using a cross-sectional drawing of the earth’s surface from an archaeological excavation to identify the evidence located at various layers (stratigraphy) and what it reveals about change over time (for example, a charcoal layer containing human remains and weapons may indicate the capture and destruction of an ancient settlement such as Troy)
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Archaeology,  Historical inquiry,  Controversy

Video

Always check your sources

What better place can you imagine for a Library of Knowledge, where the answers to all questions can be found, than beneath the paws of the Sphinx? Sounds perfect. But how reliable are your sources of information? Make up your own mind as you watch this clip about ancient Egypt's legendary hall of records.

Video

What's inside a mummy?

How can new technology be used to find out what's in a mummy without unwrapping it? Watch as Horus, an Egyptian mummy, is taken to hospital to undergo a CT (computed tomography) scan. The scan reveals what is under Horus's bandages, tells historians the age he died, and might provide some clues about the reason for his death.

Text

Mummification in Bronze Age Britain

This resource is about the discovery of two Bronze Age mummies in Britain. It describes the discovery by a team of archaeologists of the bodies of a male and a female under the floor of a prehistoric house on the Hebridean Island of South Uist. It presents the evidence for mummification following investigations using archaeological ...

Interactive

Ages of treasure timeline

This is an illustrated and annotated timeline of the Ancient World, from the Palaeolithic era to the Norman era. The timeline moves through seven distinct eras: Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman, Anglo-Saxon, Viking and Norman. It includes images of the key sites and treasures from Britain's ...

Interactive

Hunt the ancestor

This is an interactive game about an archaeological dig or quest. The object is to find an ancient burial site and protect it from being destroyed by local quarry owners who want to extract chalk from the field. Students are given an amount of money and have to locate where the burial site is using a variety of research ...

Image

Neck ornament, c1890s

This is an Aboriginal neck ornament from central Australia, believed to have been made in the late 1800s. It comprises two pairs of eaglehawk claws, connected with resin to a string made of human hair. The ornament is 43 cm long and 4 cm wide.

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Forehead ornament, c1916

This is an Aboriginal forehead ornament from the Northern Territory, believed to have been made in the early 1900s. It comprises more than 30 kangaroo teeth, each embedded in beeswax and then attached to a string. Lengths of string extend out at both ends of the ornament. The ornament is 45 cm long and 9.5 cm wide.

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Rock painting, Carnarvon Gorge, 1938 - item 1 of 2

This sepia photograph of an Indigenous rock painting shows several stencilled hands and what appear to be boomerangs. In some of the images three fingers and thumb are prominent and in the central image the little finger is bent. The images appear to be well preserved. The photograph was taken in 1938 at Carnarvon Gorge ...

Image

Rock painting, Carnarvon Gorge, 1938 - item 2 of 2

This 1938 sepia photograph of a large Indigenous rock painting displays many stencilled hands, boomerangs, coolamons and a net-like shape, possibly representing a cycad, on a cliff wall in Carnarvon Gorge in central Queensland. A large rock near the wall shows some engraved art. The photograph was taken during the second ...

Image

Kimberley points, late 19th century

This image shows five small, sharp cutting blades known as 'Kimberley points' that were made of different coloured glass and ceramic materials by Indigenous Australian craftspeople in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. They are an average of 8 cm long and 2.5 cm wide. The points at top right and bottom left show ...

Video

Archaeology unearths a mass-murder site

Discover a historic site that could reveal new evidence of the first recorded mass murder on Australian soil. The site is Beacon Island, a small island off the coast of Western Australia near present-day Geraldton. In this clip, reporter Mark Bennett visits the island with two members of a 1963 expedition that first investigated ...

Video

Ancient Chinese civilisation

The basin of Huang He, or the Yellow River, is considered the birthplace of Ancient China. What did this ancient civilisation have in common with other ancient civilisations? New advances in science and technology are traits of a civilisation. How did iron smelting revolutionise farming for the ancient Chinese?

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Radio pirates

Imagine life before mobile phones. In this 1973 clip from a Four Corners program, discover the lengths that many determined Australians were prepared to go to in order to communicate through the air waves from their cars and other locations. This was long before the invention of mobiles, video conferencing, social media ...

Video

Indus Valley Civilisation

The Indus River is located in present-day Pakistan and is the birthplace of the Indus Valley Civilisation. What do we know of this civilisation? What are some characteristics of this civilisation that are similar to that of other river valley civilisations? Why do we know less of the Indus Valley Civilisation than we do ...

Video

Outback House - meeting the participants

Imagine leaving your home to travel back to a time over 150 years ago, to live and work on an outback farm. Sixteen Australians take part in a reality TV show about life on Oxley Downs, a sheep station built to look and work as a real station would have in the 1860s. Meet some of the participants and find out what job they ...

Video

Weather and war: the Kokoda Trail, 1942

The Kokoda Campaign was tough. The terrain was steep, the vegetation dense and the enemy close at hand and unseen. And then there was the weather! In this clip from the Weather Quarter, find out how the weather in the winter of 1942 influenced the outcome of one of Australia's most challenging military operations.

Video

Colonial times

In the mid-1800s in the colony of New South Wales, an astronomer and a special telescope called a transit circle were required to accurately calculate time at Sydney Observatory. Find out how time was calculated and how it was then communicated to the people below Observatory Hill in the surrounding town of Sydney.

Video

The fight to save Kelly's Bush

Discover why a determined group of residents in one of Sydney's wealthier suburbs stood up to their local council, the New South Wales government and a big property developer. This ABC report explores the controversy surrounding the planned development of Kelly's Bush, situated beside Sydney Harbour at Woolwich, and the ...

Video

Outback House - school newspaper

Imagine leaving your home to travel back to a time over 150 years ago, to live and work on an outback farm. Sixteen Australians take part in a reality TV show about life on Oxley Downs, a sheep station built to look and work like a real station of the 1860s. Discover how a colonial squatter's children did their schoolwork. ...

Video

The role of the Nile in Ancient Egypt

Like other early civilisations, the rise of Ancient Egypt was dependent on the fertile land around a river. By learning about and adapting to the conditions of the Nile River, ancient Egyptians were able to increase their agricultural productivity to support a large population. Why was this vital for a civilisation to flourish?