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History / Year 7 / Historical Knowledge and Understanding

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

The nature of sources for ancient Australia and what they reveal about Australia’s past in the ancient period, such as the use of resources (ACDSEH031)

Elaborations
  • investigating the discovery of Mungo Woman in 1969 and the use of radiocarbon dating to draw conclusions about the longevity of human occupation at Lake Mungo
  • generating a range of questions to investigate a source (for example, a shell midden in ancient Australia – where it was found, how long it was used for, what it reveals about technology and the use of environmental resources)
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
ScOT terms

Aboriginal history,  Historical sources,  Archaeology,  Australian history

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