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History / Year 8 / Historical Knowledge and Understanding

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Continuity and change in society in ONE of the following areas: crime and punishment; military and defence systems; towns, cities and commerce (ACDSEH051)

Elaborations
  • investigating different types of crime and punishment (for example, trial by combat as a privilege granted to the nobility; being hung, drawn and quartered as a punishment for heinous crimes such as treason, and the use of the ducking stool as a punishment for women) and in what ways the nature of crime and punishment stayed the same, or changed over time
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
ScOT terms

Cities,  Fiefdoms,  Armed forces,  Security,  Sentencing,  Law,  Middle Ages,  Towns

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