History / Year 8 / Historical Knowledge and Understanding

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Significant developments and/or cultural achievements that reflect the concentration of wealth and power in the city-states, such as art and learning (ACDSEH056)

Elaborations
  • describing the work of Leonardo da Vinci (for example, his artworks Mona Lisa and The Last Supper and inventions: a rudimentary helicopter and solar power); the work of Michelangelo (for example, the Sistine Chapel paintings, David, Pietà); the thinking of Copernicus (for example, astronomy – seeing the sun as the centre of the universe); and the invention of the printing press
  • investigating learning in the Renaissance period (for example, humanism, astrology, alchemy, the influence of ancient Greece and Rome)
General capabilities
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
ScOT terms

Learning,  Renaissance,  Italian history,  City-states,  Oligarchy,  Renaissance art

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Shoguns rule Japan with iron fists

Who were the shoguns and how did they rule Japan? In Japanese history, the time from about 1600 to 1868 is called the Edo period. In 1600, after centuries of wars, Japan came under the control of shoguns from the Tokugawa clan. They continued to rule until 1868, when they were overthrown. View this clip to discover how ...

Interactive resource

Discovering democracy: democracy timeline

Use a timeline to find information about significant events and ideas in the development and evolution of democracy in the world, focusing on Australia. Nominate specific years or scroll from the latest date back to 0 (where events dated BC are listed).

Teacher resource

ICT In Everyday Learning: A Toolkit for Teachers

This website illustrates how pedagogy, content and technology can be successfully and effectively integrated in order to promote learning. A series of activities across year levels F-10 in English, mathematics, science and history suggest practical approaches using the Australian Curriculum to integrate technology into ...

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The end of Japan's isolation

Under the shoguns, Japan was deliberately isolated from the outside world from around 1600 CE. However, by the mid-19th century, Western imperialism was entering a new phase of expansion that no Asian state was able to resist. Discover what happened when the West came beating on the doors of a closed society. This clip ...

Interactive Resource

Writing a discussion

The resource contains information, activities and tasks on how to write a discussion. It includes writing and publishing templates for students for a variety of purposes and contexts. This resource supports the Australian Curriculum in English K–10.

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Japan's shoguns keep everyone in their places

What was the status of each social class in shogunate Japan? During the period from around 1600 to 1868, Japan was a feudal society. As in medieval Europe, each group had its place in a strict social order. Watch this clip to discover the roles of each group during the age when the Tokugawa shoguns ruled the country. This ...

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Systems of Exchange and Trade

This short (4 minute) video offers an overview of the history of world trade, focusing on the beginnings during the time of agrarian civilisations. The four great civilisations of the Romans, the Kushans, the Parthians and the Han Chinese were the key players, with their development of roads, ports and coin systems. The ...

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Defeat of the Inca Empire Conquistador

Imagine a thriving society: food is abundant, roads connect cities replete with gold and silver, and large and powerful armies protect the rulers of millions of citizens. In this clip from the 1985 documentary 'Sweat of the Sun, Tears of the Moon', reporter Jack Pizzey considers how such a successful society was subdued ...

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How to smell like a Norman knight

The Normans were descended from Vikings who took control of the part of France we call Normandy. Norman knights conquered England following the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Discover what life was like for boys aiming to become Norman knights, including what they ate, drank and learnt, and how often their clothes were washed.

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Australian gold diggings, c1855

This is an oil painting measuring 70.5 cm x 90.3 cm, painted about 1855 by Edwin Stocqueler (1829-1895), showing men working on the Bendigo gold field in Victoria. The men are panning, puddling and cradling for gold on both sides of a stream in a tent-dotted valley. The valley is stark, with only a few trees remaining. ...

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Tokugawa shogunate is overthrown

How did Japan's Tokugawa shogunate come to an end? The entry of the US fleet into Tokyo Bay in 1853 and the events that followed exposed the shogunate's policy of isolation as a potential threat to the country. Western influence, and Japan's response to it, would have an enormous impact on the country's future. This clip ...

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Rebuilding a Shinto shrine

Witness the dedication of the followers of Shinto, Japan's ancient and unique religious tradition. Shinto means 'the way of the spirits', and it grew out of older beliefs that spirits inhabit mountains, forests and other natural places. Watch this clip from 2007 to see a 1,300-year-old Shinto tradition in central Japan.

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The Battle of Hastings, again!

How was England changed forever by one battle in 1066? In that year, a Norman army led by Duke William of Normandy sailed to England and defeated the Saxon army of Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings. Visit the site of the battle during a re-enactment by medieval history buffs. This is the first of two clips.

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Dirty tricks in 1066

How was William of Normandy able to defeat the Saxon army of Harold Godwinson in 1066 and become the king of England? The Norman's victory at Hastings marked the beginning of their complete conquest of England over the following few years. Discover the tactics of both sides in the Battle of Hastings. This clip is the second ...

Video

Naming of the Federal Capital of Australia, 1913: Telegraphists spread the news

This black-and-white silent clip from 12 March 1913 shows telegraphists and other individuals crowded into a temporary structure telegraphing news of the ceremony to name Canberra to Sydney, New South Wales. The intertitle, with typing error, announces that the telegraphists shown sitting behind their keyboards, wearing ...

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Why did civilisations expand?

This short video offers an overview of why civilisations expanded, by looking at the past for commonalities and patterns. The need to expand is one such pattern with massive empires growing then collapsing. Expansion was necessary to pay for increasing infrastructure, government and the military, and internal resources ...

Teacher resource

Visible thinking

Visible Thinking is a flexible and systematic research-based approach to integrating the development of students' thinking with content learning across subject matters. At the core of Visible Thinking are practices that help make thinking visible: Thinking Routines loosely guide learners' thought processes and encourage ...

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Boys playing marbles at school in 1925

This is a black-and-white photograph of boys gathered in a circle to play marbles at lunchtime at the Telopea Park School in Canberra in 1925.

Video

Naming of the Federal Capital of Australia: The Ceremony, 1913: Lord Denman, governor-general

This silent black-and-white clip shows governor-general Lord Denman at the ceremony to name Canberra on 12 March 1913. Lord Denman is seen arriving on horseback and then laying one of the foundation stones for the 'Commencement Column', flanked by prime minister Andrew Fisher, in ceremonial black coat and silk hat, and ...

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General Post Office, Brisbane, c1886

This is a black-and-white illustration of the General Post Office in Queen Street, Brisbane, Queensland, c1886. It shows some people outside the building, and others travelling past in a double-decker horse-drawn tram.