English / Year 3 / Language / Language variation and change

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Curriculum content descriptions

Understand that languages have different written and visual communication systems, different oral traditions and different ways of constructing meaning (ACELA1475)

Elaborations
  • learning that a word or sign can carry different weight in different cultural contexts, for example that particular respect is due to some people and creatures and that stories can be passed on to teach us how to live appropriately
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
ScOT terms

Word meanings,  Language conventions

Interactive Resource

Syllabus bites: Visual literacy

A resource with information, study guides and resources on visual literacy to support the English K-10 Australian Curriculum in English. It provides a series of activities, guidelines and tasks about visual texts from a variety of sources. Contains writing scaffolds, templates and proformas for responding and composing ...

Moving Image

Decoding Chinese calligraphy

This resource is a video titled ‘Decoding Chinese Calligraphy’ that shows master Chinese calligrapher Cai Xingyi demonstrating the five major scripts of Chinese calligraphy. Set to traditional Chinese music, the video shows the word ‘Autumn’ being written in each of the scripts - Seal, Clerical, Standard, Semicursive and ...

Assessment resource

Wonderful words: space: assessment

Test your ability to create lively sentences by selecting the most appropriate words. For example, view animations of a rocket and an astronaut. Next, add appropriate adjectives and adverbs to two simple sentences about them to make the sentences more lively. Select a suitable connecting word or phrase to join your two ...

Assessment resource

Super stories: verbs and adverbs: assessment

Assess your ability to choose effective verbs, adverbs and illustrations to increase the impact of a horror story and make it scarier. Explain the reasoning behind some of your choices.

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Super stories: The Abandoned House: verbs and adverbs

Help a publishing director create a bestselling horror story. Read the story. Choose effective verbs and adverbs to increase the impact of the story by making it scarier. Select illustrations that highlight the horror of the events.

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Wonderful words, creative stories: space

Add descriptive words to two simple sentences about a rocket and an astronaut to make the sentences more interesting. Try out different descriptive words in each sentence. Notice how your choice of words affects the animated images in each sentence. Use your two lively sentences as the start and end of an imaginative story. ...

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Wonderful words, creative stories: pets

Add descriptive words to two simple sentences about a cat and a fish to make the sentences more interesting. Substitute different descriptive words in each sentence. Notice how your choice of words affects the animations for the sentences. Use your two lively sentences as the start and ending of an imaginative story. Check ...

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Wonderful words, creative stories: beach

Add descriptive words to two simple sentences about a boy and a girl at the beach to make the sentences more interesting. Try out different descriptive words in each sentence. Notice how your choice of words affects the animated images in each sentence. Use your two lively sentences as the start and ending of an imaginative ...

Assessment resource

Wonderful words: pets: assessment

Test your ability to create lively sentences by selecting the most appropriate words. For example, view animations of a cat and a fish. Next, add appropriate adjectives and adverbs to two simple sentences about them to make the sentences more lively. Select a suitable connecting word or phrase to join your two lively sentences. ...

Assessment resource

Wonderful words: beach: assessment

Test your ability to create lively sentences by selecting the most appropriate words. For example, view animations of a boy and a girl on the beach. Next, add appropriate adjectives and adverbs to two simple sentences about them to make the sentences more lively. Select a suitable connecting word or phrase to join your ...

Assessment resource

Read between the lines: neighbourhood: assessment

Assess your understanding of signs around a neighbourhood so that you can answer a question about pets. Analyse the information in each sign to work out the implied meaning, and to determine the opinions, feelings and ideas about pets in the neighbourhood. Record your opinion of what each sign means. Review the information ...

Assessment resource

Read between the lines: park: assessment

Assess your understanding of signs in a park so that you can answer a question about whether it is healthy for children. Analyse the information in each sign to work out the implied meaning, and to determine the opinions, feelings and ideas about how healthy the park is for children. Record your opinion of what each sign ...

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Super stories: The Abandoned House: nouns and adjectives

Help a publishing director create a bestselling horror story. Read the story. Choose effective nouns and adjectives to increase the impact of the story and make it scarier. Select illustrations that highlight the horror of the events. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Collection

Create interesting writing

This collection of 16 digital curriculum resources provides activities and ideas to develop students' writing skills. It includes focused interactive activities to improve students' writing and to help them to engage audience interest through the use of effective adjectives, adverbs, verbs, metaphors, similes and plot structures. ...

Interactive resource

Wonderful words, creative stories: food

Add descriptive words to two simple sentences about a chef and a lady in a restaurant to make the sentences more interesting. Experiment by substituting different descriptive words in each sentence. Notice the impact of your word choices on the accompanying animation for each sentence. Use your two lively sentences as the ...

Teacher resource

Storytelling traditions - unit of work

In this unit of work, students learn about storytelling traditions and how they may be used to pass on important cultural knowledge, such as Dreaming. They listen to, read and view traditional stories now told using writing, illustrations and digital forms. They respond to the stories by creating oral, written and visual ...

Assessment resource

Show and tell: that cat: assessment

Assess your ability to construct sentences by creating a recount of a cartoon about a cat chasing a dog. Select phrases to create sentences and build a basic factual recount. Rearrange the phrases to create the best word order in the sentences. Who was involved? What did they do? When, where or how did they do it? Add adjectives ...

Assessment resource

Wonderful words: food: assessment

Test your ability to create lively sentences by selecting the most appropriate words. For example, view animations of a chef and a diner. Next, add appropriate adjectives and adverbs to two simple sentences about them to make the sentences more lively. Select a suitable connecting word or phrase to join your two lively ...

Tablet friendly (Interactive resource)

Letter planet: igh, ear, str

Help a stranded space traveller return home by filling three fuel tanks with words that have the same letter pattern. Select words with combinations of 'igh', 'ear' or 'str'. Read and listen to model words. Select similar words with the same pattern and place them in the fuel tank. Then construct sentences by putting words ...

Interactive Resource

BBC Skillswise: words to watch out for - homophones

This is a word game in which students recognise common homophones and pair them by turning over counters to reveal them one by one. There are three levels to the game. In level one, students match six pairs of homophones; in level two, they match eight and in level three, ten. Each word is read aloud and accompanied by ...