Close message Scootle has stopped supporting resources that use the Adobe Flash plug-in from 18 Dec 2020. Learning paths that include these resources will have alerts to notify teachers and students that one or more of the resources will be unavailable. Click here for more info.

English / Year 5 / Language / Phonics and word knowledge

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Understand how to use knowledge of known words, base words, prefixes and suffixes, word origins, letter patterns and spelling generalisations to spell new words (ACELA1513)

Elaborations
  • talking about how suffixes change over time and new forms are invented to reflect changing attitudes to gender, for example policewoman or salesperson
  • using knowledge of known words and base words to spell new words, for example the spelling and meaning connections between ‘vision’, ‘television’ and ‘revision’
  • learning that many complex words were originally hyphenated but are now written without a hyphen, for example ‘uncommon, ‘renew’, ‘email’ and ‘refine’
  • applying knowledge of spelling generalisations to spell new words, for example ‘suitable’, ‘likeable’ and ‘collapsible’
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
ScOT terms

Word formation,  Language conventions,  Morphemes,  Spelling

Online

TrackSAFE Education Primary School Resources: Year 5 and Year 6 English

This unit of work focuses on the influences that impact on safe behaviours in and around tracks, platforms and trains. Guided activities build students' rail safety vocabulary including grammar and word building. Modelled writing activities support students to shape a research-based inquiry investigating factors that impact ...

Video

Study English: cause, effect and countries

Discover how to use 'cause and effect' language to improve your writing and speaking. In this clip, presenter Margot Politis unpacks a video report on greenhouse gases. You'll expand your vocabulary and gain tips on spelling the names of some countries and nationalities.

Video

Study English: word families

Discover some simple ways to build your vocabulary and understand different parts of speech. In this clip, presenter Margot Politis unpacks a video report on electronic crime. You will learn how to build word families and recognise nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. You'll also get some tips on spelling.

Interactive

Beach safety: video campaign

Look at the importance of water safety and skin protection at a beach. Talk with a lifeguard and beach goers about safety tips. Build a video for a public awareness campaign. Choose animated clips to illustrate responsible behaviour. Examine differences between formal and informal language. Select text for the script that ...

Interactive

Point of view: newspaper report

Examine a model newspaper report to learn about structure and use of verbs, adverbial phrases and pronouns. Read and listen to two witness reports of a skateboarding accident. Identify the two different points of view. Arrange paragraphs for the newspaper report. Select suitable verbs and adverbial phrases for the report. ...

Interactive

Point of view: witness reports

Read and listen to three witness reports of a skateboard crash. Notice that each report presents a different point of view. Look at a model report to see how past tense verbs and opinion adjectives shape the point of view in a text. Build reports by choosing verbs and adverbs to reflect each witness's point of view. Include ...

Interactive

Finish the story: bushfire

Edit a comic book story to make it more exciting and complete. Look closely at a narrative about an adventure where a couple driving home are trapped by a bushfire. Choose an ending. Improve the story by adding adverbs, choosing verbs and changing nouns to pronouns. Choose a title and image for the cover.

Interactive

Super stories: The Sea Cave: nouns and adjectives

Help a publishing director create a bestselling horror story. Read the story. Choose effective nouns and adjectives to increase the impact of the story and make it scarier. Select illustrations that highlight the horror of the events. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Video

Language and the generation gap

Are you, like, fully sick at English? Or does that thought make you rofl? Some words and phrases that have crept into our language seem to infuriate many people. Language can be a significant part of our identity, but it's useful to think about how our language choices represent us in different situations and contexts. ...

Video

Efficient speech: the process of language change

Wassup, bro?Well 'pparently I ain't speakin' right.Will thou ha' the truth on't?We often think that only young people speak in abbreviated forms, but the truth is people have been doing this since Anglo-Saxon times! In this clip discover with Professor Kate Burridge some words that belong to the 'zero plurals' group, why ...

Video

Words and sayings over time

Have you ever wondered where sayings like 'hanging by the skin of your teeth' come from? Professor Kate Burridge explains the origin and meaning of this saying. She also explains the opposite word (antonym) to 'misogynist' (someone who hates or has a long and deep prejudice against women) and the origins of the word 'goodbye'.

Video

'Bought' or 'brought' and radio code

Changes in the use, pronunciation, and meaning of common everyday English words happen all the time. Professor Kate Burridge explains that we can see this in the way people increasingly switch the past tense of the verbs 'buy' and 'bring'. She also answers a viewer's question about why 'Roger' is used on two-way and CB radios.

Video

Expeditions return home from 'New Holland'

Discover what happens when the expeditions of Matthew Flinders and Nicolas Baudin return home. Both explorers brought back detailed maps and specimens, including live kangaroos and emus, from 'New Holland'. How will each explorer be celebrated and remembered? Watch this clip to find out.

Video

The Aussie Accent: whaddya reckon, mate?

Imagine a world where everybody sounded exactly the same when they spoke. What might that be like? Are there 'good' and 'bad' ways to speak? In this clip, listen to the opinions of many people about whether Australians have a bad accent.

Video

A song about the Kookaburra's call

Have you heard a Kookaburra's call? Watch this clip and listen to the lyrics of the song performed by Don Spencer that captures in sounds and words the magical call of the kookaburra.

Video

Rebuilding a Shinto shrine

Witness the dedication of the followers of Shinto, Japan's ancient and unique religious tradition. Shinto means 'the way of the spirits', and it grew out of older beliefs that spirits inhabit mountains, forests and other natural places. Watch this clip from 2007 to see a 1,300-year-old Shinto tradition in central Japan.

Video

Growing up in the Ord River Valley

Katie Innes takes us on a trip back in time to where she grew up. She shows us a series of photographs from the Ord River Valley near Kununurra, in Western Australia. Over the years people have made major changes to the environment in this place. Katie wonders whether all of their efforts will prove worthwhile in the long run. 

Audio

Pink suits and circus wagons in 'The Great Gatsby'

Part of the success of F Scott Fitzgerald's novel 'The Great Gatsby' is the intriguing title character, Jay Gatsby. In this audio clip, explore the effect that Fitzgerald's skilfully-constructed character has on those who read the novel. Find out what makes this character so intriguing.

Video

What's the plural for 'octopus'?

Do you know what the plural for octopus is? What about the plural for platypus? See if you can guess the plurals for both before you watch this video. What were your reasons for choosing the plurals you did?

Video

Learn a Dhurga greeting

Walawaani! Learn this Dhurga greeting by listening to teacher Kerry Boyenga and the students of St Mary's Primary School in Moruya. Walawaani means "We hope you've had a safe journey here", or "We hope you have a safe journey home". Dhurga is the first language of the NSW far south coast between Wandandean, Braidwood and ...