English / Year 6 / Language / Language variation and change

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Curriculum content descriptions

Understand that different social and geographical dialects or accents are used in Australia in addition to Standard Australian English (ACELA1515)

Elaborations
  • recognising that there are more than 150 Aboriginal languages and two Torres Strait Islander languages and that they relate to geographic areas in Australia
  • recognising that all languages and dialects are of equal value, although we use different ones in different contexts, for example the use of Standard Australian English, Aboriginal English and forms of Creole used by some Torres Strait Islander groups and some of Australia‚Äôs near neighbours
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
ScOT terms

Accents (Speech),  Australian English,  Aboriginal English,  Dialects

Interactive Resource

Syllabus bites: Visual literacy

A resource with information, study guides and resources on visual literacy to support the English K-10 Australian Curriculum in English. It provides a series of activities, guidelines and tasks about visual texts from a variety of sources. Contains writing scaffolds, templates and proformas for responding and composing ...

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The Buyungurra who didn't listen

Listen as Bianca McNeair shares the story of "The Buyungurra who didn't listen". This is a traditional story that Bianca's mother told her when she was growing up. Bianca uses words from the Malgana language, which is spoken in the area around Shark Bay in Western Australia.

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Discover the diversity of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages

Marrin Gamu is a special video created by First Languages Australia to show the diversity and beauty of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages. There are five languages featured in this clip: Kalaw Kawaw Ya, Warrgamay, Nywaygi, Yugambeh and Wiradjuri. Across Australia there are hundreds of traditional ...

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Learn to count in Kaurna!

Presenter Taylor Power-Smith helps us learn to count to ten in Kaurna, the Indigenous language of the Kaurna people of Adelaide and the Adelaide Plains. 

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Twelve canoes: language

This is a rich resource about the languages of the Yolngu clans of north-east Arnhem Land. Its centrepiece is a short film narrated by a Yolngu storyteller, who describes why different clans have different languages and how the languages differ from each other and from English. He explains how language defines the individual ...

Teacher resource

Indigenous Australians: early vocabularies

This is a multilayered resource about the early vocabularies of the Australian Indigenous languages. The resource presents four vocabulary lists from different regions across Australia that were compiled by early European settlers and visitors. Links provide access to the vocabulary lists. The lists are presented as notebooks ...

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Name parts of the body in Dhurga

Watch and listen as students of St Mary's Primary School in Moruya teach you how to name eight body parts in Dhurga. Dhurga is the first language of the NSW far south coast between Wandandean, Braidwood and Wallaga Lake.

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Count to 10 in Gomeroi

Learn how to count to 10 in Gomeroi! Community cultural leader Matthew Priestley has been teaching students at Moree East Public School how to speak the traditional Gomeroi language. Listen as the students teach you.

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Welcome to Shelly Beach, Port Lincoln

Watch and listen as local Parnkalla (Barngarla) boys Darnell and Kaiden Richards take you to their special place: Shelly Beach in Port Lincoln, South Australia. Learn some local Parnkalla words as the boys share a story about what connects their family and community to this beach.

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Learn a Dhurga greeting

Walawaani! Learn this Dhurga greeting by listening to teacher Kerry Boyenga and the students of St Mary's Primary School in Moruya. Walawaani means "We hope you've had a safe journey here", or "We hope you have a safe journey home". Dhurga is the first language of the NSW far south coast between Wandandean, Braidwood and ...

Assessment resource

Improve our town: arguments: assessment

Test your understanding of the arguments concerning a community issue. Help a local council decide on a development proposal. Determine whether the best use of a demolition site in the centre of town will be for a park or for a mall. Talk to people in the local community to find out their opinions. Restate the reasons given ...

Interactive resource

Aussie English for the beginner

This interactive resource allows students to explore the origins and meanings of common Australian words and idioms and to test their knowledge of Australian English. The definitions are provided by the Australian National Dictionary Centre and the cartoons are by David Pope.

Interactive resource

Rap machine: space travel

Mix your own rap music. Start with some model lyrics and beats. Change each line to make a new rap about space travel. View words in either rap or standard English. Choose a beat. Get a rapper to perform your song. This learning object is the first in a series of three objects that progressively increase in difficulty.

Interactive resource

Rap machine: talent quest

Mix your own rap music. Start with some model lyrics and beats. Change each line to make a new rap about a talent quest. View words in either rap or standard English. Choose a beat. Get a rapper to perform your song. This learning object is the last in a series of three objects that progressively increase in difficulty.