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English / Year 8 / Language / Language for interaction

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Understand how conventions of speech adopted by communities influence the identities of people in those communities (ACELA1541)

Elaborations
  • understanding that our use of language helps to create different identities, for example teenage groups and sportspeople have adopted particular words or ways of speaking
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
ScOT terms

Natural languages,  Cultural identity

Video

Using language to describe being Australian

What are some iconic Australian symbols? No doubt people would say the kangaroo, the koala or the emu. But what about sheep? Have they played a part in shaping the way Australians see themselves?

Audio

An interview with Lady Mary Fairfax (1973)

Lady Mary Fairfax was president of the Australian Opera Foundation. In this interview she talks about a formal ball held in her home to celebrate the opening of the Sydney Opera House in 1973. Listen to the interview, which outlines the menu, entertainment and security arrangements.

Video

Asian and Australian: it's easy to be me

Many Australians are members of two cultures: the culture of their homes and the culture of society at large. In this Heywire clip, learn about the experiences of Michael Lam, whose Vietnamese Australian family lives in Townsville, Queensland.<br /><br />Could you write or record a story about yourself and/or your community? ...

Video

David Crystal: English as a global language

Imagine a world where everyone spoke English. It would make life a lot easier, right? But what would be lost in such a world? In this clip, explore the impact of English becoming a 'global' language. Listen to linguist Professor David Crystal as he considers ways in which English is likely to be influenced in the future.

Video

One English language or many?

Do people around Australia all speak the same English? In this clip, explore the ways that language evolves and consider the impacts that other 'Englishes', such as British English and American English, can have on the way we speak.

Video

What your language says about you

Do you know what a 'bevan' is? Or are you more familiar with 'bogans', 'westies', 'chiggers' or 'boonies'? These are all terms used to describe the same kind of person. How is it that different places in Australia develop different expressions? In this clip, explore some of the reasons behind Queensland's colloquialisms.

Video

Efficient speech: the process of language change

Wassup, bro?Well 'pparently I ain't speakin' right.Will thou ha' the truth on't?We often think that only young people speak in abbreviated forms, but the truth is people have been doing this since Anglo-Saxon times! In this clip discover with Professor Kate Burridge some words that belong to the 'zero plurals' group, why ...

Audio

Paul Hogan and Australian slang

Listen to Australian comic actor Paul Hogan talk to reporters in February 1987 about the Oscars and his role as Mick Dundee in the film 'Crocodile Dundee' (1986). Hogan played a laid-back outback survivalist in this hugely successful film, which is known for its use of Australian slang. Take note of Hogan's own use of Australian ...

Video

Chilling with the butcher's dog

Perhaps no term conjures the Australian character more than the ubiquitous 'G'day, mate'. But are Australians in danger of losing the colourful language they're known for? This clip examines some of the colloquialisms that might be in danger of disappearing.

Video

Conquest: the process of language change

When the Normans conquered England in 1066, they brought a lot more than fancy clothes and castles; they also brought the French language. Discover the impact that this momentous event continues to have today.

Audio

Learning Dharug, Aboriginal language of Sydney

Imagine a time when the Aboriginal language Dharug was the official language spoken in the Sydney area. During this audio clip, reflect on how the language was considered almost 'lost', but (and) discover how Richard Green and others are piecing the Dharug language back together. Find out about how it is being taught at ...

Video

Preserving 'Norf'k Laengwij'

Imagine living on a tiny island thousands of kilometres from the Australian mainland. Would you feel like you were part of Australia? This is the dilemma for people living on Norfolk Island, an Australian territory in the Pacific Ocean. In the past, Norfolk Islanders were expected to learn English - but, as this clip from ...

Video

Exploring the genre and setting of your story

Every genre has different rules. But once you know them, you can choose which rules you want to break. Find out how you can mix and match genres to create unique, interesting stories!

Video

Memory in 'My Place'

Sally Morgan's autobiography, 'My Place', recounts the experiences of the author, her mother and her grandmother. Why do the panellists in this video think it is such an important book? What issues does it address?

Video

Rhythm and metre

Have you ever had a song or a jingle that got stuck in your head? This can happen because of the rhythm in the song or the jingle. Rhythm helps us to remember a song, jingle or poem by reminding us of other songs, jingles or poems with the same rhythm. Once you get a rhythm stuck in your head it can be very difficult to ...

Video

Sounds

In poetry every word, syllable and sound counts! Poetry is usually much shorter than stories so it is important for a poet to convey as much as possible using as little as possible. Sounds can be a very powerful tool in expressing mood and emotion when used correctly. Watch as Matt from the Sydney Story Factory gives examples ...

Video

Tom Keneally and 1960s Australia

Have you heard of the 1967 Referendum, Vincent Lingiari or the Freedom Ride? The late 1960s was a period of great social upheaval with many young Australians unhappy with the treatement of Indigenous Australians and with Australia's involvement in the Vietnam War. How effective is Thomas Keneally's parallel between the ...

Video

Tom Keneally on belonging

Thomas Keaneally says in this interview, "I was of Australia, in Australia, but not fully of it." What do you think he means by this? Can you relate to his sentiment? Why/why not?

Video

Gary Crew and the role of objects

In some stories, writers use particular objects as symbols. In other stories, writers use objects as tools to help them shape their narrative. What does Gary Crew say about the meaning of the ring in Strange Objects? What is its purpose within the story?

Video

Learn to count in Kaurna!

Presenter Taylor Power-Smith helps us learn to count to ten in Kaurna, the Indigenous language of the Kaurna people of Adelaide and the Adelaide Plains.