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English / Year 9 / Language / Language for interaction

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Understand that roles and relationships are developed and challenged through language and interpersonal skills (ACELA1551)

Elaborations
  • identifying the various communities to which students belong and how language reinforces membership of these communities (the intimate language of family members, the jargon of teenage groups, the technicality of some online communities, the language specific to recreational groups, the interaction patterns of the classroom, the commonalities in migrant and cultural groups)
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Social settings (Narratives)

Collection

Oodgeroo Noonuccal

This collection of 13 digital curriculum resources focuses on Oodgeroo Noonuccal (1920-93), renowned Indigenous poet, activist and artist. It is organised into four categories - her life; role as an activist; fame as a poet; and emergence as a visual artist. The collection includes photographs, a pamphlet, a leaflet, interviews, ...

Audio

Evolving English: the role of social media

How many times have you heard teenagers berated for using the term 'like'? Yet this term has existed at least since 1586 when the term, 'Yon man is like out of his mind' was written into history. The truth is, our language is constantly evolving, with new words added, others dying off and some resurfacing again. In this ...

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Understanding Aboriginal English

Australian English has evolved to adopt terms from Aboriginal languages, some of which are widely used. 'Yakka' and 'bung' are two examples. Can you think of some more? Aboriginal communities have likewise adopted English terms, like 'deadly' but with different meanings, creating 'Aboriginal English'. Can you think of some ...

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Aunty Joy Wandin Murphy welcomes you to Country

Watch as Aunty Joy Wandin Murphy describes her experiences growing up in Australia as an Aboriginal woman, and how this has influenced and continues to inspire the work she does. What does she hope to achieve by sharing her story and the culture and language of the Wurundjeri people, Woiwurrung?

Interactive Resource

Truth be told

This resource embeds the use of online collaboration tools and 21st century learning skills in a Stage 5 English project. Students explore the English textual concepts as they collaborate to research and create a personal story. Tasks include analysing a variety of personal stories told in different media and exploring ...

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I may only be a fish and chip shop lady

Pauline Hanson is one of Australia's most controversial politicians. In a short time she gained a significant following before public opinion turned against her. In this clip, listen to excerpts from her first (maiden) speech to Parliament in 1996 and discover how this fiery politician attracted such attention.

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This isn't English, it's Australian English!

Mara Zeissig had a hard time understanding what was going on when she first went to school in Australia after moving from Buenos Aires, Argentina. In her Heywire audio story, explore the importance of language in our social interactions.<br /><br />Could you write or record a story about yourself and/or your community? ...

Teacher resource

Heroic Indigenous endeavours - Teacher idea

This Teacher idea explains how TLF materials were used to encourage students to analyse and think critically about racism in different contexts. It includes a unit of work developed and trialled by a teacher.

Audio

Churchill speaks of blood, toil and victory

Winston Churchill is regarded as one of history's greatest orators. One of his most famous speeches was given to the British House of Commons on 13 May 1940, three days after he was appointed prime minister in the early stages of World War II. Discover the power of his oratory in this audio clip.

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Ronald Reagan: commemorating heroism

Few things reveal both the best and worst of humanity more than war. The D-Day landings of World War II were full of horror and heroism and are commemorated in this speech by former President of the United States of America, Ronald Reagan. Explore the construction of this speech and how it is shaped to suit audience and purpose.

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Conquest: the process of language change

When the Normans conquered England in 1066, they brought a lot more than fancy clothes and castles; they also brought the French language. Discover the impact that this momentous event continues to have today.

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Influences on Australian English

How has Australian English evolved since colonisation? Language experts Bruce Moore and Sue Butler explore the impact that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages have had on it. They discuss what this means for Australia's cultural identity. This clip was broadcast in 1998.

Interactive Resource

Different views

This resource will encourage students to develop their understanding of the first contact of the Aboriginal people of Kamay Botany Bay and the men aboard the HMB Endeavour in 1770. This resource is one part of the 'Endeavour – eight days in Kamay' resource.

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Chilling with the butcher's dog

Perhaps no term conjures the Australian character more than the ubiquitous 'G'day, mate'. But are Australians in danger of losing the colourful language they're known for? This clip examines some of the colloquialisms that might be in danger of disappearing.

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Malalai Joya's voice of dissent

Malalai Joya is a former Afghani politician who, as a young woman of 25, stood up in a room crowded with 503 mostly male political delegates to denounce the warlords who had taken control of Afghanistan. Her action was supported by many but was denounced by those in power. Today, Joya continues her political activism.

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Anything's possible

What are writers of Young Adult (or YA) fiction seeking to achieve? What obligations do they have to their audience, if any? In this clip, listen as four successful authors share their ideas on these things.

Audio

Is youse alright? What's okay in English?

Have you ever wondered why we use the word 'you' to refer to both one 'you' or many of 'you'? Or have you ever heard anyone refer to many of 'you' using the once grammatically incorrect word 'youse'? This program considers the words we use when we are talking to each other face to face. It also looks at the use of the word ...

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Powerful words: Gough Whitlam's dismissal

Gough Whitlam is the only Australian prime minister to have been sacked from office - along with his entire government. After learning of his dismissal, Mr Whitlam addressed the Australian public and uttered a line that has resonated throughout Australian politics since 1975. Words can be immensely powerful and, as you ...

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Pretty polly: how politicians speak

If politicians are the 'voice of the people', does their way of speaking resemble that of the people? In this clip from 1975, listen to Professor John S Gunn describe what he sees as a uniquely Australian rhythm of speech. Then see how many similarities and differences you can find as you listen to some brilliant imitations ...

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Core speech with extras, thanks

A national survey in the 1960s indicated that the use of spoken English was surprisingly similar throughout Australia. This challenged the notion of 'regionalism', which suggested that people from different places would use language in different ways. In this clip, two leading academics discuss regionalism and suggest that ...