English / Year 10 / Language / Language variation and change

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Curriculum content descriptions

Understand that Standard Australian English in its spoken and written forms has a history of evolution and change and continues to evolve (ACELA1563)

Elaborations
  • investigating differences between spoken and written English by comparing the language of conversation and interviews with the written language of print texts
  • experimenting with and incorporating new words and creative inventions in students’ own written and spoken texts
  • understanding how and why spelling became standardised and how conventions have changed over time and continue to change through common usage, the invention of new words and creative combinations of existing words
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
ScOT terms

Language conventions,  English language

Interactive Resource

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A web page resource with information, teacher guides and activities on types of sentences to support the Australian Curriculum in English K–10. It has detailed activities, links to resources and quizzes.

Interactive Resource

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