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English / Year 10 / Language / Language for interaction

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Understand how language use can have inclusive and exclusive social effects, and can empower or disempower people (ACELA1564)

Elaborations
  • identifying language that seeks to align the listener or reader (for example of course, obviously, as you can imagine)
  • identifying the use of first person ‘I’, ‘we’ and second person pronouns ‘you’ to distance or involve the audience, for example in a speech made to a local cultural community
  • identifying references to shared assumptions
  • identifying appeals to shared cultural knowledge, values and beliefs
  • reflecting on experiences of when language includes, distances or marginalises others
  • creating texts that represent personal belief systems (such as credos, statements of ethical judgements, guidelines, letters to the editor and blog entries)
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Social relations

Video

I may only be a fish and chip shop lady

Pauline Hanson is one of Australia's most controversial politicians. In a short time she gained a significant following before public opinion turned against her. In this clip, listen to excerpts from her first (maiden) speech to Parliament in 1996 and discover how this fiery politician attracted such attention.

Video

The language of criticism

Language is a powerful tool and the way it is used can sometimes disempower or devalue people and their ideas. Listen to young art critic and aspiring painter Robert Hughes as he discusses the Beat Generation. Explore how questions can be used to influence listeners and how language can reveal the attitudes and values of ...

Video

Malalai Joya's voice of dissent

Malalai Joya is a former Afghani politician who, as a young woman of 25, stood up in a room crowded with 503 mostly male political delegates to denounce the warlords who had taken control of Afghanistan. Her action was supported by many but was denounced by those in power. Today, Joya continues her political activism.

Video

Using visual language to represent status

Have you ever felt judged because of where you live? This clip from 1967 explores the reactions of residents to a survey that ranks Melbourne's suburbs. But is this clip as guilty as the survey for reinforcing particular views of these places? You be the judge.

Video

Richard Flanagan - being a courageous writer

Whether we realise it or not, we are all storytellers. Every day we compose text messages, write emails or tell stories to friends and family. Yet when we are asked to write a story and share it with others, many of us find the process terrifying. This can sometimes be the case for published authors too. In this clip, discover ...

Video

Ronald Reagan: commemorating heroism

Few things reveal both the best and worst of humanity more than war. The D-Day landings of World War II were full of horror and heroism and are commemorated in this speech by former President of the United States of America, Ronald Reagan. Explore the construction of this speech and how it is shaped to suit audience and purpose.

Audio

Words as weapons: speech-making and democracy

Have you heard the term 'freedom of speech' or thought about how speaking in public or public speaking could be linked to freedom? Find out how these words are linked as you listen to this audio program, which considers the importance of speaking in public to the history of democracy in the USA.

Video

Influences on Australian English

How has Australian English evolved since colonisation? Language experts Bruce Moore and Sue Butler explore the impact that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages have had on it. They discuss what this means for Australia's cultural identity. This clip was broadcast in 1998.

Video

The climate change debate

Climate change is a hot topic. Watch this clip to see examples of how some well-known Australians use language and persuasive techniques in a very public Q&A panel discussion on the issue.

Video

Ian McEwan's 'perfect thing'

What does it take to be a great writer? Ian McEwan is the author of several prizewinning novels and screenplays, and was identified by 'The Times' of London as one of the 50 greatest British writers since 1945. In this conversation with journalist and presenter Jennifer Byrne, Ian discusses what he thinks it takes to be ...

Audio

Churchill speaks of blood, toil and victory

Winston Churchill is regarded as one of history's greatest orators. One of his most famous speeches was given to the British House of Commons on 13 May 1940, three days after he was appointed prime minister in the early stages of World War II. Discover the power of his oratory in this audio clip.

Video

Writing from the fringe

Imagine a mysterious island with a wild, rugged landscape and a history of tragedy and hardship. But it is also an island of unrivalled beauty with a purity of nature rarely found today. Sound like something out of a novel? Well, it's Tasmania and it has inspired the writing of many novels, not the least of which are those ...

Interactive

Successfully speaking

How do some people command an audience using only the instrument of their own voice? Why do some speeches change the world, while others make us change the channel? Learn how your understanding of the purpose and context of your speech can help you to engage your audience so your speeches can make a difference too.

Video

How to use rhetoric to get what you want

This short video for students describes the fundamentals of rhetoric and shares some tips for appealing to an audience's ethos, logos and pathos in your speech.

Interactive

Find your voice

Students learn about, compose and perform slam poetry.

Video

Pretty polly: how politicians speak

If politicians are the 'voice of the people', does their way of speaking resemble that of the people? In this clip from 1975, listen to Professor John S Gunn describe what he sees as a uniquely Australian rhythm of speech. Then see how many similarities and differences you can find as you listen to some brilliant imitations ...

Video

What's in a name? Book title dilemmas

Authors can agonise over the titles of their novels. Trying to capture the intent of an entire book in just a few words can be tricky! In this clip, learn the story behind the title of JK Rowling's novel 'The Casual Vacancy'.

Video

I speak, you guess

Listen to the voices of a small selection of students from around Australia to see if you can guess where they live. Is place the most important thing that shapes their language, or are there other factors that influence how people speak?

Audio

Gender convergence in teenager swearing

Explore how the use of swearing by teenagers is changing. Maria Zijlstra talks to Mike Thelwall, Professor of Information Science at the University of Wolverhampton, about the upsurge in swearing on social networking sites, especially among girls. He contends that, in the UK in particular, swearing is losing its shock value ...

Video

Presenting a point of view about marriage equality

Marriage equality is a controversial issue in Australia, one that has provoked media sensationalism, political rhetoric and heated arguments. Sometimes, however, quieter voices make their point amid all the furore. Explore the voice of Lochsley Wilson in his Heywire audio story.<br /><br />To talk with someone about anxiety ...