English / Year 10 / Language / Language for interaction

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Understand how language use can have inclusive and exclusive social effects, and can empower or disempower people (ACELA1564)

Elaborations
  • identifying language that seeks to align the listener or reader (for example of course, obviously, as you can imagine)
  • identifying the use of first person ‘I’, ‘we’ and second person pronouns ‘you’ to distance or involve the audience, for example in a speech made to a local cultural community
  • identifying references to shared assumptions
  • identifying appeals to shared cultural knowledge, values and beliefs
  • reflecting on experiences of when language includes, distances or marginalises others
  • creating texts that represent personal belief systems (such as credos, statements of ethical judgements, guidelines, letters to the editor and blog entries)
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Social relations

Interactive Resource

Syllabus bites: Visual literacy

A resource with information, study guides and resources on visual literacy to support the English K-10 Australian Curriculum in English. It provides a series of activities, guidelines and tasks about visual texts from a variety of sources. Contains writing scaffolds, templates and proformas for responding and composing ...

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Using persuasive techniques in writing

Faced with an issue you feel strongly about, how might you convince others to share your viewpoint? Writing persuasively is an important skill. Based on a clip from Q&A, this exercise will assist you in constructing a persuasive text on a complex issue: newspaper ownership in Australia.

Teacher resource

Identity and Cultural Diversity

This resource is a professional development package which focuses on global education concepts of identity and cultural diversity through the subject of English for Years 7-10. It provides a range of activities that support cross-curriculum integration, with syllabus programming, quick lesson ideas,a series of lessons, ...

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One English language or many?

Do people around Australia all speak the same English? In this clip, explore the ways that language evolves and consider the impacts that other 'Englishes', such as British English and American English, can have on the way we speak.

Audio

Is youse alright? What's okay in English?

Have you ever wondered why we use the word 'you' to refer to both one 'you' or many of 'you'? Or have you ever heard anyone refer to many of 'you' using the once grammatically incorrect word 'youse'? This program considers the words we use when we are talking to each other face to face. It also looks at the use of the word ...

Interactive Resource

Difference Differently: media madness

This is a resource with four related sets of student activities that explore how and why the Australian news media represents different cultural, social and religious groups. It explores media texts to see how language and literary devices, such as inference and emotive language, can be used to influence readers’ perceptions ...

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Influences on Australian English

How has Australian English evolved since colonisation? Language experts Bruce Moore and Sue Butler explore the impact that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages have had on it. They discuss what this means for Australia's cultural identity. This clip was broadcast in 1998.

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How to use rhetoric to get what you want

This short video for students describes the fundamentals of rhetoric and shares some tips for appealing to an audience's ethos, logos and pathos in your speech.

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The climate change debate

Climate change is a hot topic. Watch this clip to see examples of how some well-known Australians use language and persuasive techniques in a very public Q&A panel discussion on the issue.

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I may only be a fish and chip shop lady

Pauline Hanson is one of Australia's most controversial politicians. In a short time she gained a significant following before public opinion turned against her. In this clip, listen to excerpts from her first (maiden) speech to Parliament in 1996 and discover how this fiery politician attracted such attention.

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I speak, you guess

Listen to the voices of a small selection of students from around Australia to see if you can guess where they live. Is place the most important thing that shapes their language, or are there other factors that influence how people speak?

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'Othello': is Iago the vilest villain?

Some characters we just love to hate! Iago, the villain in Shakespeare's 'Othello', is a perfect example: scheming, manipulative but oh-so-clever. James Evans and actor Damien Ryan both of Bell Shakespeare, discuss the complex role of Iago. Evans explains just how skilfully Shakespeare employs language to fashion the dark ...

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Powerful words: Gough Whitlam's dismissal

Gough Whitlam is the only Australian prime minister to have been sacked from office - along with his entire government. After learning of his dismissal, Mr Whitlam addressed the Australian public and uttered a line that has resonated throughout Australian politics since 1975. Words can be immensely powerful and, as you ...

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Pretty polly: how politicians speak

If politicians are the 'voice of the people', does their way of speaking resemble that of the people? In this clip from 1975, listen to Professor John S Gunn describe what he sees as a uniquely Australian rhythm of speech. Then see how many similarities and differences you can find as you listen to some brilliant imitations ...

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Core speech with extras, thanks

A national survey in the 1960s indicated that the use of spoken English was surprisingly similar throughout Australia. This challenged the notion of 'regionalism', which suggested that people from different places would use language in different ways. In this clip, two leading academics discuss regionalism and suggest that ...

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Going into battle for graphic novels

Many readers love comic books and graphic novels. According to the four graphic novelists in this discussion, not everybody shares this enthusiasm! As you listen to their discussion, consider how the language we use in everyday conversations can work to judge and even disempower others. This clip is one in a series of four.

Audio

Churchill speaks of blood, toil and victory

Winston Churchill is regarded as one of history's greatest orators. One of his most famous speeches was given to the British House of Commons on 13 May 1940, three days after he was appointed prime minister in the early stages of World War II. Discover the power of his oratory in this audio clip.

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Naming words: significant social effects

The names we give people and places hold great significance for us. But have you ever thought about how this simple act can impact on others? Naming is a powerful tool. Watch this clip as Professor Kate Burridge explains the ways that language can have significant social effects.

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David Crystal: English as a global language

Imagine a world where everyone spoke English. It would make life a lot easier, right? But what would be lost in such a world? In this clip, explore the impact of English becoming a 'global' language. Listen to linguist Professor David Crystal as he considers ways in which English is likely to be influenced in the future.

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Richard Flanagan - being a courageous writer

Whether we realise it or not, we are all storytellers. Every day we compose text messages, write emails or tell stories to friends and family. Yet when we are asked to write a story and share it with others, many of us find the process terrifying. This can sometimes be the case for published authors too. In this clip, discover ...