Close message Scootle will stop supporting resources that use the Adobe Flash plug-in from 18 Dec 2020. Learning paths that include these resources will have alerts to notify teachers and students that one or more of the resources will be unavailable. Click here for more info.

English / Year 5 / Language / Phonics and word knowledge

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Understand how to use phonic knowledge to read and write less familiar words that share common letter patterns but have different pronunciations  (ACELA1829)

Elaborations
  • recognising and writing less familiar words that share common letter patterns but have different pronunciations, for example ‘journey’, ‘your’, ‘tour’ and ‘sour’
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
ScOT terms

Phonemes,  Pronunciation

Teacher resource

Teaching AC English

This is a resource for instructional leaders and teachers containing video vignettes and supporting text that demonstrate differentiation and explicit teaching of the Australian Curriculum: English in the areas of reading, spelling, punctuation and grammar across a range of classrooms from Foundation to year 10. The vignettes ...

Teacher resource

Indigenous peoples: people, place, language and song

This is an interactive resource about Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their cultures. Learning activities explore how place, language and song relate to Indigenous Australian peoples. The resource is a unit of work using multimodal texts including music video clips, picture storybooks, songs ...

Moving Image

From possessive apostrophes to discombobulation!

People often worry about the use of apostrophes. See how Professor Kate Burridge answers a question about how to use the apostrophes after certain names, telling us how the rule has changed over time. She also explains the origins of the word 'discombobulate' and why the plural of house is not 'hice'.

Moving Image

Words and sayings over time

Have you ever wondered where sayings like 'hanging by the skin of your teeth' come from? Professor Kate Burridge explains the origin and meaning of this saying. She also explains the opposite word (antonym) to 'misogynist' (someone who hates or has a long and deep prejudice against women) and the origins of the word 'goodbye'.

Moving Image

Word histories: how extraordinary!

Words can change over time and so can their meanings. The word 'extra' broke away from other words to become a word on its own. Professor Kate Burridge explains how this impacts on words like 'extraordinary'. She also explains the origins and meanings of the words 'hearse' and 'rehearse''.

Moving Image

Got or gotten? What a nightmare!

Words have a history. Knowing their history helps us to understand what they mean and why some people use them in different ways. Professor Kate Burridge explains how the use of the past tense of the verb 'get' (gotten) has changed, but is still in use by many people. She also discusses the history of the word 'nightmare'.

Interactive Resource

BBC Skillswise: wordsearch 'ight' - activity

This is a wordsearch game about the common letter pattern 'ight'. Students find and circle 12 examples of words ending with the '-ight' letter pattern hidden on a grid of letters that are written horizontally, vertically or diagonally on the grid. Students can choose to play the game against the clock. An example of the ...

Interactive Resource

BBC Skillswise: wordsearch 'ieve' - activity

This is a wordsearch game about the common letter pattern 'ieve'. Students search a grid of letters to find ten examples of words containing the 'ieve' letter pattern that are written horizontally, vertically or diagonally on the grid. Students can choose to play the game against the clock. An example of the game is provided ...

Interactive Resource

BBC Skillswise: wordsearch 'ould' - activity

This is a wordsearch game about the common letter pattern 'ould'. Students search a grid of letters to find ten examples of words containing the 'ould' letter pattern that are written horizontally, vertically or diagonally on the grid. Students can choose to play the game against the clock. An example of the game is provided ...

Moving Image

The 'H' wars

How do you pronounce the letter ‘h'? Why do you think there is more than one way to pronounce this letter? Watch this video to find out why some people may pronounce the letter ‘h' as 'aitch' as opposed to 'haitch'. If you'd like to learn more on this topic, visit this site.

Moving Image

Why do we say the words the way we do?

What kinds of things might influence the way we pronounce words in English? Professor Kate Burridge explains why knowing when 'kilometre' came into English helps us to understand why it is pronounced differently from similar words such as 'kilogram' and 'centimetre'. She also explains what it means to 'barrack' for a team.

Moving Image

'Bought' or 'brought' and radio code

Changes in the use, pronunciation, and meaning of common everyday English words happen all the time. Professor Kate Burridge explains that we can see this in the way people increasingly switch the past tense of the verbs 'buy' and 'bring'. She also answers a viewer's question about why 'Roger' is used on two-way and CB radios.

Moving Image

Challenging grammar rules, darlings and crowbars

Find out that what appears to be a straightforward grammar rule behind the use of the words 'fewer' and 'less' may not be as straightforward as it seems! Professor Kate Burridge explains that this grammar rule has been under challenge for centuries. She also explains the origins of the word 'darling' and why the 'crow' ...

Moving Image

Dude: American words and pronunciations

Where does the word 'dude' come from? Why do speakers of English often pronounce words differently depending on their country of origin - not only because of their accent? Find out with Professor Kate Burridge when she takes on these questions from viewers.

Text

BBC Skillswise: silent letters - information sheet

This is a single-screen information sheet about nine silent letters - silent n, g, b, k, t, h, w, l and u. The information sheet includes a definition of silent letters and an explanation of their origin and how some came to be silent when in earlier periods they were pronounced. It provides three examples for each silent ...

Teacher resource

Creating change as a literacy coach

This teacher resource describes how a literacy coach made a substantial difference to students' literacy achievements, teachers' involvement in literacy strategies and whole-school culture at Allendale East Area School in South Australia. Organised in nine sections: Summary; Target student group; Method; Results; Lessons ...

Teacher resource

Principals as Literacy Leaders Project

This teacher resource describes the Principals as Literacy Leaders (PALL) professional learning strategy aimed at strengthening the capability of school principals to bring about improvement in the reading abilities of students in low socioeconomic status and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The resource ...

Moving Image

Plum puddings, yelks to yolks and elfs to elves

Why are Christmas puddings called 'plum puddings' when they have no plums in them? How did the egg yolk get its name and why are the plurals for 'hoof' and 'roof' are spelt differently? Find out how Professor Kate Burridge answers these questions that the audience of 'Wise Words' send in for her.