English / Year 10 / Literature / Literature and context

View on Australian Curriculum website Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority
Curriculum content descriptions

Compare and evaluate a range of representations of individuals and groups in different historical, social and cultural contexts (ACELT1639)

Elaborations
  • investigating and analysing the ways cultural stories may be retold and adapted across a range of contexts such as the ‘Cinderella’ story and the ‘anti-hero’
  • imaginatively adapting texts from an earlier time or different social context for a new audience
  • exploring and reflecting on personal understanding of the world and human experience gained from interpreting literature drawn from cultures and times different from the students’ own
General capabilities
  • Literacy Literacy
  • Critical and creative thinking Critical and creative thinking
  • Intercultural understanding Intercultural understanding
  • Personal and social capability Personal and social capability
ScOT terms

Social settings (Narratives),  Text purpose

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